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In Praise of the (Agile) Product Owner

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43. In Praise of the (Agile) Product Owner // Who has the toughest time "Being Agile"? Is it the Dev Team? Is it the Lead Developer? What about the Business Owner? Or is it... the Product Owner? → SUBSCRIBE for a NEW EPISODE every WEDNESDAY: http://www.DevelopmentThatPays.com/-/subscribe Arguably, it's the Product Owner that has the toughest job "being Agile". Building software in small, iterative cycles is easy to "sell" to a development team. But it takes nerves of steel on behalf of the Product Owner to trust that product features will build over time. Music: 260809 Funky Nurykabe: ccmixter.org/files/jlbrock44/29186 You've seen these guys before. Question. Who has the toughest time being Agile Is it the Dev Team Maybe The Lead Developer Possibly. The Business Owner Could be. Or is it... (and I think it might be...) The Product Owner. Boxes and Walls ---- Hi this is Gary Welcome to 'Development That Pays'. I wanted to turn the spotlight on the Product Owner. But I could't decide what to talk about Then Vlad came to my rescue with this great comment that gets right to the heart of one of the hardest aspects of being a Product Owner. "Problem now is that some of them do not upgrade, and continue to use the “boxes” to climb the wall…" Clearly, that's going to need some context. A recurring theme here on Development That Pays are the twin concepts of do the right thing, and do the thing right Way back in Episode 2, i used the metaphor of two walls Each wall is a potential business opportunity. And each ladder represent is a product. What more important: building a great ladder or, picking the right wall Well, any old ladder will get you up the wall But... the walls lead to very different places. So we can say that: Picking the right wall is more important than building a great ladder. Doing the right thing is more important that Doing the thing right. HOWEVER... There's a fatal flaw in the argument And that's what we went on to talk about in Episode 3 From this point, both of the walls look the same. From this point you can't see what's on the other side So you've no choice but to climb up there and take a look. It's Catch 22. You need to pick the right wall... But you can't pick the right wall until you've climbed the wall which you can't do without... picking a wall! One thing is for sure: If we’re going to have to climb a wall that may turn out to be the wrong wall Then this is no time for Do The Thing Right. No, this is the time to get there quickly and cheaply Certainly not an escalator Nor a staircase. A ladder would be a good choice Or even - dare I say it - a pile of boxes. Getting Stuck with the Boxes ----- We now have the context we need for Vlad's comment. Vlad's concern is that we get stuck with the pile of boxes ... even after we've found the perfect wall. Come with me now to a meeting. The meeting was called by the Product Owner She has an an idea for a new product. She's invited the entire dev team. to come and discuss a new product idea. She walks up to the whiteboard and draws something that looks a lot like an escalator A discussion follows. The dev team is clearly concerned about the scale of the task At a certain point, the lead dev walks up to the whiteboard and says What about if we start by building this... ... then we can come back and build this ... then this ... then this From there it should be easy to build what you've asked for. Quick aside ---- At this point, I'd like you to take a moment and notice how you feel about this plan of action. Are you comfortable with it Do you have concerns Back to the Meeting ---- My guess is that these guys [the developers] like the idea For them, it's an easy sell: This thing [the escalator] looks like a nightmare to code. This thing [the pile of boxes] looks straightforward. Could be live by the end of the week. Bish bash bosh. What about the Product owner How does it look from her point of view The picture isn't nearly as rosy. First of all, there's a big different between what she asked for and what she's going to get - at least in the short term Then there's the "challenge" that version two is CONDITIONAL on the success of version one (And version one looks so ropey that it's hard to see it being a success!) And if the first version is a success, what then How long will it be before it can be built The Dev team have spare capacity now... but will they have spare capacity a month from now Hard to say. And we haven't even talked about stakeholders. If the Product Owner agrees to this course of action, her next job - when she leaves the meeting - will be to 'sell' the approach to various internal stakeholders. None of which https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0Ax7eJuNX8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=502ILHjX9EE
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Text Comments (4)
I Lonare (1 year ago)
Hi I found this amazing product owners description here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2Yhn1MCG3c What do you think of it?
Development That Pays (1 year ago)
It's good. It's also stolen - here's the original: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=502ILHjX9EE
Scrum (2 years ago)
It's great when the entire team (including business, Product Owner, customers, and other stakeholders) learn to embrace the possibility of terminating the cycle once the desired or needed value is achieved, therefore reducing cost (see only x% of features are actually used), in order to change direction to provide the next most valuable thing.
Tiger Li (3 years ago)
Always hard to make decision.

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