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Aral Sea: Man-made environmental disaster - BBC News
 
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Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews It took just 40 years for the Aral Sea to dry up. Fishing ports suddenly found themselves in a desert. But in one small part of the sea, water is returning. Latest satellite pictures reveal that 90% of the Aral Sea has dried up, forming a new desert between Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan in Central Asia. It's a man-made environmental disaster. As part of the BBC's Richer World Season, Rustam Qobil visits the Aral Sea, a toxic desert sea bed, and talks to people who have lost their sea, health and loved ones. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Views: 172894 BBC News
Resurrecting the Aral Sea
 
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Aral Sea (2007): For decades, the Aral Sea has been described as dying and beyond salvation. But now, the water is flowing back, bringing economic revival and hope for the future. For downloads and more information visit http://www.journeyman.tv/57367/short-films/aral-sea.html Fifty years ago, the Soviets diverted the rivers that fed into the Aral sea to irrigate crops. The sea shrunk to half its size, salinity increased, the natural ecosystem collapsed and people moved away in search of jobs. But now, thanks to a new dam, water levels have risen by 4 meters. People are returning in the hope the sea will make a full recovery. As one man states; "If the sea comes back, life will change for the better". ABC Australia - Ref. 3510 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 253921 Journeyman Pictures
Video: Dried-up Aral Sea springs back to life
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now: http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN Straddling the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, the Aral Sea was once the fourth-largest saline lake in the world, an inland sea of 66,000 square kilometres. But in 1950, the Soviets diverted the two rivers that fed it in order to irrigate fields and grow cotton. Little by little, the Aral Sea dried up, ruining thousands of livelihoods. Since the construction of a dam in 2005, the water is slowly beginning to rise, and with it residents' hopes. FRANCE 24 went to meet them. http://www.france24.com/en/taxonomy/emission/20373 Visit our website: http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 1059033 FRANCE 24 English
Full Documentary: "Aral. The lost sea" by Isabel Coixet | We Are Water Foundation
 
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The drying up of the Aral Sea is one of the greatest environmental disasters in history. Between 1954 and 1960, the government of the former Soviet Union ordered the construction of a 500 km-long canal that would take a third of the water from the Amu Darya River for an immense area of irrigated land in order to grow cotton in the region. The increasing need for water, due to bad transport management and a lack of foresight and efficiency in land irrigation, meant that more water had to be diverted from rivers flowing into the Aral Sea. As a result, in the eighties, the water reaching the port was as little as 10% of the amount in 1960, and the Aral Sea began to dry up. Consequently, the Aral Sea currently occupies half of its original surface area and its volume has decreased by a quarter, 95% of the nearby reservoirs and wetlands have become deserts and more than 50 lakes from deltas with a surface area of 60,000 hectares have dried up. In terms of climate, this process has eliminated the area’s environmental shock absorbing capacity, making winters and summers harsher, with a subsequent increase in severe droughts. The wind has displaced tons of the saline sand that was originally at the bottom of the dried-up area to a distance of up to 200 km, which has drastically exacerbated the situation. Added to this, fertilisers and pesticides were used indiscriminately, polluting the air and groundwater. The Soviet goal to have saline water at four times the limit recommended by the WHO reduced the groundwater level from 53 to 36 metres, which in turn caused serious problems with the supply of drinking water. The consequences for the health of the population have also been extremely serious. The region has the highest infant mortality rates in all of the former Soviet Union. Chronic bronchitis has increased by 3000% and arthritis by 6000%. In the Uzbek region of Karakalpakstan, anaemia is epidemic among women and 97% of them have haemoglobin levels lower than the 110 grams per litre of blood established by the WHO. Experts point out that this is caused by the consumption of stagnant water containing zinc and magnesium. In the same zone of Uzbekistan, liver cancer increased by 200% from 1981 to 1987, throat cancer by 25% and infant mortality by 20%. Also, cases of hepatitis, respiratory disease, eye-related illness and intestinal infection in the region are seven times higher than in 1960. All of this occurred in a relatively short period of time and the most shocking thing is that it happened with an almost total lack of international awareness. In 2003, satellite pictures from NASA demonstrated the full scale of the disaster and what many scientists had already announced. World opinion is now mobilising and we are beginning to find out the full extent of the current human disaster. In January 1994, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan signed an agreement pledging 1% of their budgets to contribute to the recovery of the sea; however, cooperation among these countries has been minimal. Currently, the northern zone of the Aral Sea is recovering slightly as a result of the construction of the Kokaral dam by the Kazak Government to retain water that would normally flow into Uzbek territorial waters. more information at www.wearewater.org
Aral Sea: The sea that dried up in 40 years - BBC News
 
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Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews The disappearance of the Aral Sea in Central Asia is one of the world's greatest man-made disasters. In Kazakhstan, with the help of the World Bank, more than $80million have been spent trying to save the most northern part of the sea but this has only benefited a few hundred people. In this film, we speak to people still living in deserted fishing ports, to see how their lives have changed, and to find out whether they believe that they'll ever see the sea again. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Views: 853191 BBC News
The Shrinking Aral Sea - Uzbekistan
 
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July 2001 For 50 years Soviet leaders diverted the rivers which feed the sea to irrigate cotton. And when it became clear that the land wasn't suited for the thirsty crop the planners simply increased the use of hazardous chemicals. "It is the world's largest man- made environmental disaster", says Ian Small for Medecins Sans Frontiers in Uzbekistan. The charity usually operates in war zones, but for the first time it has now set up a project devoted solely to an environmental catastrophe. The war here is against tuberculosis, kidney disease and cancers - plaguing the people of the region. Some are caused by toxins, some by the high levels of salt in the water. "Almost nothing grows and it's hard for people -- salt concentrates in their joints and they can't walk for a long time...", says Aigali Tankimalov who sailed the Aral Sea for 29 years. Now the wreck of the vessel he commanded in the navy sits opposite his front door -- and the nearest water is 100 kilometres away. The last of the 20 or so species of fish that lived in the Aral Sea died out in the 1980s, the victims of an environmental catastrophe. Yet despite the dramatic evidence of environmental destruction, Uzbekistan's new leaders continue to grow cotton and scientist fear the damage is irreparable. Produced by ABC Australia Distributed by Journeyman Pictures
Views: 64104 Journeyman Pictures
The Dried up Aral Sea Eco-Disaster
 
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http://www.furiousearth.com Explorer/adventurer George Kourounis visits the Aral Sea in western Uzbekistan where wasteful irrigation practices by the former Soviet Union have drained most of the water, creating a vast ecological disaster. Rusting fishing boats lie in the desert sands that used to be rich fishing grounds. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gkourounis/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/georgekourounis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ExplorerGeorgeKourounis/ Filmed as part of the Angry Planet TV series. Produced by: www.peterrowe.tv
Views: 1783548 gkourounis
13 Shocking Russian Photos Explained
 
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From Russian special forces training with cinderblocks on their stomachs to weird transparent frogs these surely are shocking pics Subscribe to American Eye http://goo.gl/GBphkv 6. The Epiphany Holiday January 19th is a holiday for the most faithful to Orthodox Christians but in Russia celebrating this holiday may get a little chilly. To celebrate the baptism of Jesus Christ, Russians take a dip underneath the frozen ice of the nearest river or lake. Despite the freezing temperatures, no one claims to get sick or hypothermia. The water can reach below 0 degrees celsius depending on the salinity of the water. Maybe that’s just Russian toughness for you. Afterwards, the participants in this activity drink warm tea, honey and cakes. 5. Mobile ICBM’s Russia’s military is no joke despite going through some tough economical crises recently. They have deployed mobile ICBM nuclear missiles. These intercontinental ballistic missiles are able to destroy an entire major city with just one launch. The Russian government claims that these mobile nukes are designed as an attack deterrent, which will keep anyone from attacking. If anything, it appears to be threatening than defensive. Weapons of mass destruction are casually transported on the back of trucks. Let’s still hope no one gets an itchy trigger finger in the launch room. 4. Aral Sea Disappearance The shrinking of the Aral Sea is noted as one of the worst environmental disasters ever. Satellite images released by Nasa are extremely shocking and entire lake that was once the 4th largest in the world disappearing should not happen. The water level decreased so quickly, that wreckage of fishing boats like this photo are in the dry lake bed! Incredible Soviet engineers wanted to begin diverting the water in order to build cotton plantations. The Aral lost a huge amount of water due to evaporation that will never be replaced. This has negatively affected nearby countries like Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. 3. Tsar Bomba The largest nuclear bomb ever dropped was tested by the Russians in 1961 in the Novaya Zemlya archipelago. The bomb was extremely large in size as well, weigh 27 metric tons and measuring in a 8 meters long by 2 meters in diameter. The largest nuclear device tested by Americas was equivalent to 15 megatons of TNT while this bomb dropped in Russia yielded 57 megatons. The blast was so powerful that it almost killed the pilot who was flying the plane. It’s been described as the single most physically powerful device ever used by mankind and the mushroom cloud you see in this photo is rather shocking to say the least. 2. Siberian Tigers Siberian Tigers are the world’s largest cat and they inhabit the eastern part of Russian forests. While some do live in China and Korea, the Siberian Tiger is extremely endangered and there are an estimated 400-500 still living in the forest today. Getting a photo of one must be extremely challenging in its natural habitat. While the conditions are much colder than where most large cats live, these animals enjoy a low human density which allows them to freely roam. Their bodies have also adapted to live in this environment with heavier coats and higher levels of fat as you can kind of tell in this photo. He’s got quite the appetite as well and can eat up to 60 pounds of food in one night! Unfortunately, this animal has been overly hunted for trophies and Chinese traditional medicines. Poaching has been reduced but their numbers are still dwindling. 1.Nuclear Lake While some lakes completely disappeared due to direct Soviet involvement other lakes seem to formed without too much thought processing. Also known as Lake Chagan, this is where the Russians were hoping to have peaceful purposes to their nuclear devices. They detonated a large 140 kiloton nuclear bomb underground to produce a crater large enough for a lake. The bomb displaced 10 million cubic meters of soil from the ground. The site was chosen near a dry lake bed Chagan river. The crater measuring 100 meters deep and 430 meters wide was filled with water from the river and a radioactive lake was formed. Soviets believed the lake would be suitable for wildlife but every animal they brought here didn’t last too long. Even a photo of a Russian army officer was capturing swimming here. Residents who live nearby the lake, claim that the lake is contaminated and seeping into their tap water. In this photo we can see it still test positive for radioactive particles.
Views: 1228002 American Eye
Expedition to Aral sea | Uzbekistan
 
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The Aral sea covered a huge territory in Central Asia lying between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Once, an abundant and waving sea, nowadays is shrinking year by year. Moynoq was formerly a sea port, and now the local people remember it with huge waves and the ships floating there. Once the life of Moynoq habitats was closely connected with the Aral sea. Most people still remember the taste of delicious sea food. The flora and fauna was very rich and unique. Interview. Genjenezer Sobirov. Candidate of biological science Since 1963 the level of the Amudarya flowing to the Aral sea has started to recede. The Syrdarya river also went down as a tributary. Reaching to the 70ies and 80ies of the last century the Aral shrank to 10-13 meters. As a result of drying the sand emerged on the seabed. Consequently, sand and poisonous dust storms once picked by strong winds rose and polluted surrounding areas. Thus, the soil fertility has radically decreased. The harmful and polluted sand even reached the town of Moynoq. This time the film crew sets off to Karakalpakstan, one of the ancient and mysterious regions of Uzbekistan. The group plans to visit Moynoq, the lakes by the sea and to film the flora and fauna of this terrain. Besides, they are going to study some archaeological sites in Ustyurt. Then the crew also wants to go to lake Sudochye and to film a huge flock of flamingo. But they change their mind as it rains from time to time. It is quite difficult to move by the sea shore after the rain. Even the cross-country vehicle may get stuck in wide desert. That’s why the film crew follow Vadim Yagodin’s advice. He is an archaeologist of the Science Academy of Uzbekistan. As an expert, he knows the Aral surroundings, the nature and climate, the flora and fauna very well. So this time he becomes a guide for the group during the expedition to Karakalpakstan. Some of the crew members have never been to Aral sea. So this trip will leave unusual impressions and unforgettable memories. The film group start for Moynoq having these thoughts in mind. The town has left behind and the vast and immense plains appear in the front view. The flora is rich and unique as trees surviving in quite challenging climate grow only around the zone of the Aral sea. On their way the crew sees small bushes and some places with lots of trees. They stop for a while watching the nature – so mysterious and fascinating. But they don’t think to meet a jackal by the road. The wild animal, suddenly appear, sees the strangers quickly disappears. At last the film crew reach the town of Moynoq. Having entered the town they get off the cars by the lake and have a little rest. In fact this lake is not big but it quite alluring. Everyone enjoys seeing the birds flying over the lake after a long and tiring trip. It’s quite delightful to notice the seagulls diving into the water and catching fish. Usually the cameramen try to snap such moments immediately. They don’t want to miss the beautiful scenes. Therefore the cameraman is not bothered and is switching all his talent.The ship standing in the central street of Moynoq reminds that the life of local people was closely connected with the sea. Passing this street one can get to the dried shore of the Aral sea. The group climb up to the hill near the old port. The local call this place “tiger’s tail” for its look. They watch the nature staying on a hill which was once a peninsula. It is hard to believe this very place used to be a port. The port was deserted and abandoned as the sea started shrink away. Now these ships are gathered near Moynoq. The lake surroundings has the original and stunning view. The boats on the shore and the birds flying and swimming in the lake instinctively remind the pictures by Matevoyan and Madgazin displayed in the museum. So, it gets clear why the painters became the admirers of this fascinating and charming landscape. The beautiful nature inspired the painters also makes us fervent. So, the group cameraman tries to capture enchanting scenery of Mother nature.
Views: 21033 ASIA WORLD NEWS
The history of Soviet Kazakhstan in pictures
 
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The history of Soviet Kazakhstan in pictures A slideshow about the history of the Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic (part of the Soviet Union), accompanied by the anthem thereof. In this slideshow: The map of USSR with the KazSSR highlighted; three flags of the KazSSR (1937, 1940, 1953); coat of arms of the KazSSR; Amangeldy Imanov, the leader of an anti-Tsarist rebellion during the First World War; a battle between the Russian army and Imanov's rebels; Vladimir Lenin, the leader of the Bolsheviks, the Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union; Alexander Dutov, Boris Annenkov and their officers - White Army commanders in Kazakhstan during the Russian Civil War; Saken Seyfullin, a leading Kazakh communist, writer, poet and statesman; Joseph Stalin, Lenin's successor; Filipp Goloshchekin, architect of Stalin's collectivisation in Kazakhstan, which caused a great famine; the location of the Kengir Concentration Camp aka Steplag; writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn, being searched in the Steplag; Kazakh heroes of the WWII - Bauyrzhan Momyshuly, Manshuk Mametova, Aliya Moldagulova, Nurken Abdirov and Talgat Bigeldinov; leaders of the KazSSR - Zhumabay Shayakhmetov (1946-1954), made advances in education, opposed the scale of Khrushchev's "Virgin Lands campaign" (see below); Panteleimon Ponomarenko (1954-1955), probably appointed due to his support for the campaign; Leonid Brezhnev (1955-1956), he later became the leader of the Soviet Union; Nikolay Belyayev (1957-1960); Ismail Yusupov (1962-1964), supported Khrushchev's plan to incorporate some cotton-growing areas in southern KazSSR to the Uzbek SSR; and Dinmukhamed Kunayev (1960-1962, 1964-1986), who opposed the aforementioned incorporation, but was reinstated after Khrushchev's downfall. Being a Brezhnev supporter, Kunayev was accused of corruption in Gorbachev's time and replaced with Kolbin; a map of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site - a major test site for Soviet Nuclear weaponry; the explosion of the first Soviet nuclear bomb; Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet leader who initiated a massive agricultural program called "the Virgin Lands campaign", which affected KazSSR greatly, namely through an expansion of agriculture and an influx of immigrants; two pictures of the Virgin Lands campaign; the location of the Baikonur Cosmodrome, the first Soviet space launching site; Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, his ship was launched from Baikonur; the shrinkage of the Aral sea, which is a result of excessive drainage of water for irrigation; Gennady Kolbin, the successor of Kunayev, whose unpopularity with the Kazakh population caused massive riots in December 1986; two pictures of the riots; Nursultan Nazarbayev, who was appointed in place of Kolbin, the last leader of the KazSSR and the first president of an independent Republic of Kazakhstan; the Republic Square and the Presidential Palace in Almaty, the former capital; the flag of the independent Kazakhstan.
Views: 26659 vonPeterhof
Mer Aral 1991
 
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This is a salvaged film from a trip to the Aral Sea in 1991 - Karakalpak, extraordinary footage, unfortunately filmed on U-matic and lost in the archives, and so there are blips in the film (it seemed worth it to upload what I had anyway) some images and interviews from the Aral Sea that is now experiencing the effects of Stalin's monumentally disastrous plan to irrigate vast cotton fields. Filmed by Dathanna (Paris) unfortunately all the film was lost in a fire at the Dathanna offices in Paris. be patient at the beginning!
Views: 270 John Kilby
Devastating Photos of the Dead Sea Drying Up!
 
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The Dead Sea has attracted visitors for thousands of years who come to float in its salty waters and reap its reported health benefits. But the attraction's days could be numbered after experts discovered the sea's water level is dropping by an average of one metre every year. Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2897538/Slow-death-Dead-Sea-Levels-salt-water-dropping-one-metre-year.html Find Me & Follow Me: https://twitter.com/ShantiUniverse https://www.facebook.com/pages/Shanti-Universe/1405680779677488 http://shantiuniversenewsnow.blogspot.com/ https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/108273886503213598014/108273886503213598014/posts Check Out my NEW Website: http://proxyponder.com ~*Get the ShantiUniverse App! For Android & iphone: http://fanapp.mobi/shantiuniverseapp
Views: 11996 ShantiUniverse
Aral Sea time lapse
 
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Aral Sea time lapse Aral Sea shrinking timelapse, 33 year evolution of the Aral sea dying out - satellite timelapse Don't click this link! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHoPoCsxxeMBDH_r5UfbqVQ?sub_confirmation=1 This timelapse shows the changes of the driying Aral sea in Russia If you have any suggestions to cover phenomena visible from space pls let me know. Aral Sea Basin, Aral Sea, Timelapse, Aral, Aralsea, Arallake, Lake, Aral Lake, Aral sea disaster, Aral sea 2018, The Aral Sea Crisis, shrinking, aral sea 2018, аральское море All the images are from Google Earth
Views: 16215 Satellite timelapse
Google Timelapse: Aral Sea
 
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Timelapse is a global, zoomable video that lets you see how the Earth has changed over the past 32 years. Explore the world through time at https://earthengine.google.com/timelapse. Image credit: Landsat / Copernicus
Views: 1268907 Google Earth
How Does An Entire Sea Virtually Vanish? (2001)
 
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The Shrinking Aral Sea (2001) - Diversion of rivers to feed cotton plantations has led Uzbekistan's Aral Sea to all but disappear - with disastrous consequences for those living nearby. Subscribe to Journeyman here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For 50 years Soviet leaders diverted the rivers which feed the sea to irrigate cotton. And when it became clear that the land wasn't suited for the thirsty crop the planners simply increased the use of hazardous chemicals. "It is the world's largest man- made environmental disaster", says Ian Small for Medecins Sans Frontieres in Uzbekistan. The charity usually operates in war zones, but for the first time it has now set up a project devoted solely to an environmental catastrophe. The war here is against tuberculosis, kidney disease and cancers which plague the people of the region. Some are caused by toxins, some by the high levels of salt in the water. All could have been avoided. For more information, visit https://www.journeyman.tv/film/1036 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures ABC Australia – Ref. 1036
Views: 5484 Journeyman Pictures
सुख गया है ये समुन्दर  The End is Near?
 
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Hello friends Welcome to new episode of FACTOMANIA. Subscribe to FActomania:- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwLj_cCyYVc0t0jM-_wMpzQ?view_as=subscriber Humans killed the world's 4th largest Sea It took just 40 years for the Aral Sea to dry up. Fishing ports suddenly found themselves in a desert. But in one small part of the sea, water is returning. Latest satellite pictures reveal that 90% of the Aral Sea has dried up, forming a new desert between Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan in Central Asia. It's a man-made environmental disaster. Subscribe to MY Channel:- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwLj_cCyYVc0t0jM-_wMpzQ Welcome to Unsolved World [Hindi] in this video i will tell you that world forth biggest SEA is come to an end. why this is happening is our world is about to end.. watch this video till the end.. 1 Rate our video out of 5..how many you give. 2 Help us to Achieve 1000 Subscriber in this month. 3 If you have any problem with this video or your suggestion please provide feed back . 5 we did not support any kind of superstition and myth this channel purpose is only entertain and provide some interesting world facts 6 we basically upload video in Hindi language. in this video i used many clips and image i dont have any rights . if any one have problem then you can email me i will put your link in the description. don't put any strike or claim..email me.. ALL footage used is either done under the express permission of the original owner, or is public domain and falls under rules of Fair Use. We are making such material available for the purposes of criticism, comment, review and news reporting which constitute the 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. Not withstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work for purposes such as criticism, comment, review and news reporting is not an infringement of copyright. music :- Martian Supernatural Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Please give us Your Support, Subscribe and share the Channel with Your Friends and Relatives. for copy right issue:[email protected] support us by. like this video, share it, give us your suggestion and subscribe to the channel. Thank You
Views: 15777 Facto Mania
CHEM092, Spring 2018 - Presentation. The Tradegy of the Aral Sea. Can We Solve It?
 
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The Presentation was made by: Timur Amanbekov Daniyar Seitembetov Ilyas Kassymzhanov and Turzhan Moldan.
Views: 187 Timur Amanbekov
Aral sea take 2.avi
 
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Pictures from around the Aral sea in need of help. Go read about its story ! It will touch your heart ! And spooky music too
Views: 306 jahwad001
Who Killed the Aral Sea - Stories Jump from Maps
 
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One of the great human-made environmental disasters. If the speaking speed is too slow, try speeding up the video to 1.5 times. Other environmental crises triggered by large powers: USA prevents Colorado river from flowing to Mexico International beef industry leads to Amazon deforestation Chinese super-projects in Myanmar threaten to flood local communities Overfishing of offshore Somalia by large companies depletes catch for locals Powerful companies or gangs of illegal loggers murder indigenous people in Peru, Ecuador References: Columbia University http://www.columbia.edu/~tmt2120/introduction.htm Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aral_Sea BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-a0c4856e-1019-4937-96fd-8714d70a48f7 karakalpak.com http://www.karakalpak.com/stanaral.html The Medieval Aral Sea Crisis http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=18963696 NY Times http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/09/world/grand-soviet-scheme-for-sharing-water-in-central-asia-is-foundering.html?pagewanted=1 Lakes by size http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lakes_by_volume http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_lakes_by_area Salinity http://www.unep.org/geo/geo1/fig/fig2-2_1.htm Image credits: "Timur Empire" by Stuntelaar - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Timur_Empire.jpg#/media/File:Timur_Empire.jpg Satellite comparisons http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AralSea1989_2014.jpg "AralShip" by Staecker - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AralShip.jpg#/media/File:AralShip.jpg "Moynaq Aral-Sea Ships" by Sebastian Kluger - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Moynaq_Aral-Sea_Ships.jpg#/media/File:Moynaq_Aral-Sea_Ships.jpg from Mr Hicks46 1. Some old fishing boats in Moynaq, Aral Sea, Uzbekistan. https://www.flickr.com/photos/teosaurio/9121875591/in/photostream/ 2. Salt lake somewhere between Atyrau and Beyneu, Kazakhstan. https://www.flickr.com/photos/teosaurio/9043328743/in/photostream/ 3. Uzbekistan Sums. https://www.flickr.com/photos/teosaurio/9124119296/in/photostream/ Aral Sea (lost again) https://www.flickr.com/photos/lamerie/8004308630/ Smaltz, Jeff. “Dust Storm over the Aral Sea : Natural Hazards.” Dust Storm over the Aral Sea: Natural Hazards. NASA GSFC, n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2014. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=19853 - See more at: http://intlpollution.commons.gc.cuny.edu/aral-sea-catastrophe/#sthash.bIOuqCM2.dpuf PEYROUSE, SEBASTIEN. “Building a New Silk Road? Central Asia in the New World Order | Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective.” Osu.edu. Ohio State University, July 2009. Web. 18 Dec. 2014. http://origins.osu.edu/article/building-new-silk-road-central-asia-new-world-order - See more at: http://intlpollution.commons.gc.cuny.edu/aral-sea-catastrophe/#sthash.bIOuqCM2.dpuf "Syr Darya River Floodplain, Kazakhstan, Central Asia" by ISS Expedition 25 crew - NASA Earth Observatory. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Syr_Darya_River_Floodplain,_Kazakhstan,_Central_Asia.JPG#/media/File:Syr_Darya_River_Floodplain,_Kazakhstan,_Central_Asia.JPG "Amudaryamap" by Background layer attributed to DEMIS Mapserver, map created by Shannon1 - Background and river course data from http://www2.demis.nl/mapserver/mapper.asp. Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Amudaryamap.jpg#/media/File:Amudaryamap.jpg Don't buy Uzbek cotton Photo by: environmental justice foundation - See more at: http://newint.org/columns/currents/2009/07/01/uzbekistan/#sthash.NuVIpAK7.dpuf http://newint.org/columns/currents/2009/07/01/uzbekistan/ Girl harvesting cotton in Kashkadarya, Uzbekistan, October 2011 (Anti-Slavery International) http://treehugginghoolah.blogspot.jp/2012/12/cotton-slavery-and-peter-lilley.html © Global Warming Images / WWF http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/how_we_work/businesses/transforming_markets/solutions/better_management_practices/ Sept. 1–3, 1977, Landsat 2 (path/row 172–174/27–30) — Aral Sea mosaic http://earthshots.usgs.gov/earthshots/node/46#ad-image-0 "Sassanian Empire 621 A.D" by Keeby101 - I used Photoshop, cropped the image, drew the borders, coloered the map and labeled all of the cities.. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sassanian_Empire_621_A.D.jpg#/media/File:Sassanian_Empire_621_A.D.jpg "Artemia salina 4" by © Hans Hillewaert. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Artemia_salina_4.jpg#/media/File:Artemia_salina_4.jpg Created and presented by Michael Henshaw
Why We Destroyed the World's 4th Largest Lake
 
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Start learning intuitively with Brilliant for 20% off by being of the first 200 people to sign up at http://brilliant.org/RealLifeLore/ Get RealLifeLore T-shirts here: http://standard.tv/reallifelore Please Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2dB7VTO Animations courtesy of Josh Sherrington of Heliosphere and Jorrit van Ginkel: https://www.youtube.com/c/heliosphere Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RealLifeLore/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RealLifeLore1 Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/RealLifeLore/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joseph_pise... Subreddit is moderated by Oliver Bourdouxhe Special thanks to my Patrons: Danny Clemens, Adam Kelly, Sarah Hughes, Greg Parham, Owen, Donna Videos explaining things. Mostly over topics like history, geography, economics and science. We believe that the world is a wonderfully fascinating place, and you can find wonder anywhere you look. That is what our videos attempt to convey. Currently, I try my best to release one video every week. Bear with me :)
Views: 1991906 RealLifeLore
Analyzing the shrinking Aral Sea
 
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Analyzing the shrinking Aral Sea, using Landsat imagery in the Esri Change Matters viewer - an ArcGIS Online web mapping application. The classic geography study - some gained, some lost. Why is this an important issue for the region and globally?
Views: 488 Our Earth
THE ARAL SEA REVISITED
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now: http://f24.my/YouTubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN ... Visit our website: http://www.france24.com Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 477 FRANCE 24 English
15 Dramatic Changes on Earth Revealed by NASA
 
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If you compare some of the photographs which can be found on NASA’s website, you can really see how human beings have changed the appearance of our world over the years. The time difference between these images ranges from five to 100 years. Incredible stuff. Other videos you might like: What If Dinosaurs Were Still Alive Today? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeFnH4xux7w& A Unique Creature on Earth That Can Never Be Killed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8893cgbUfg& The Solar System Is Not Like You Think It Is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FvpAe3MacM& TIMESTAMPS: Pedersen Glacier, Alaska 0:20 Aral Sea, Central Asia 0:44 Lake Oroville, California 1:06 Carroll Glacier, Alaska 1:22 Powell Lake, Arizona and Utah 1:50 Bear Glacier, Alaska 2:19 Forests in Rondonia, Brazil 2:45 McCarty Glacier, Alaska 3:03 The Dasht River, Pakistan 3:22 Matterhorn Mountain in the Alps 3:38 Toboggan Glacier, Alaska 3:54 Great Man-Made River, Libya 4:16 Qori Kalis Glacier, Peru 4:35 Mar Chiquita Lake, Argentina 4:52 Muir Glacier, Alaska 5:08 SUMMARY: - Pedersen Glacier is an outlet glacier located in Kenai Fjords National Park near Seward. The photo taken in 1917 shows that it was an ordinary massive glacier once. No icebergs are visible anymore. - The Aral Sea in Kazakhstan almost disappeared by 2014 due to the extensive irrigation of cotton fields. - Lake Oroville was hit hard by the lack of water while California was suffering from a severe drought. - The photo taken at the same place almost 100 years later shows that the Carroll glacier still exists, but it has serious problems. The ice cap has melted and has been covered with natural debris. - Powell Lake is an artificial reservoir located on the Colorado River. It’s easy to notice that its water level has reduced over 15 years. - The rise in temperature from 1950 to 1990 caused the giant Bear Glacier to retreat by one mile. From 2000 to 2005, it moved another two miles. - Since the 1960s, Amazon rain forests have been actively cut down. According to current estimates, they now have about 80% left. The state of Rondonia in Brazil lost most of its forests. - Toboggan Glacier covered a large territory once. Unfortunately, like many other glaciers on our planet, this one keeps melting fast. Comparing the two photos, you can see that there is less snow in 2000. - Qori Kalis Glacier located in the Andes mountains of Peru. Frankly speaking, it's almost impossible to recognize this place nowadays – the difference is truly shocking. - Mar Chiquita Lake is the biggest salt lake in South America. As you see, it has become smaller in recent years, but the area still looks lush. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2343387 BRIGHT SIDE
Project Mongolia Pt 7 - Uzbekistan, Aral Sea - aventyrsrally.se
 
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Part 7 - Uzbekistan and the Aral Sea Aral Sea: Covered with salt and toxic chemicals due to weapons testing. Agent orange sprayed the fields of cotton and the irrigation canals drained parts of the sea. A sad story for a lot of children who had cancer from birth and fishermen without fish. A trip from Sweden to Mongolia for SOS Children´s Villages Pictures, new projects and more material at: Website: http://www.aventyrsrally.se/ Blogg: http://aventyrsrally.wordpress.com/
Views: 332 aventyrsrally.se
Before-And-After Satellite Images of Earth from Space
 
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Amazing before and after satellite images taken from the International Space Station show how quickly our dynamic, but fragile planet can change. FB for daily news: http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ NASA's Images of Change: http://go.nasa.gov/2iQG005 Music: Opus One by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/ Video conceptualized, co-written, narrated, and produced by Bryce Plank Video editing and effects by Robin West Researched and co-written by Juliet Saunders Script: These before and after images demonstrate how quickly our dynamic, but fragile planet can change. The Aral Sea in central Asia was once the fourth largest lake in the world. In the 1960’s, the Soviet Union began using it to help grow crops. These images were taken just 14 years apart. Losing the moderating influence of this large body of water has made the region’s winters colder and summers hotter. In 2011, NASA captured a new volcanic island emerging in the Red Sea off the coast of Yemen. It’s part of the Red Sea Rift where the African and Arabian tectonic plates meet, the island chain gained an additional rock in 2013 that doesn’t even appear in this photograph. By tapping water sources beneath the sands of Saudi Arabia, engineers turned the desert into an oasis. But with only 50 more years of groundwater supply left, the clock is ticking. Farmers could survive though by switching to greenhouse farming with drip irrigation. The Muir Glacier in Alaska has been documented for 120 years. Named for Scottish naturalist and writer John Muir, the glacier used to fill this entire inlet. This photo taken in 2004 shows how warmer temperatures have caused its shocking, 31-mile retreat. It may seem like a winter wonderland, but many of Yellowstone National Park’s 2 million-plus acres are now prone to wildfire. Longer, drier summers are a big problem. But this 2016 image actually shows how Yellowstone has recovered from the 1988 fire that consumed more than half of the park. And in 1984, Brazil plugged the Jamari river with the Samuel hydroelectric dam. The reservoir it created flooded the upstream forest. The image on the right also captures the effects of deforestation that could cut the Amazon to just 47% of its original size by 2030. The Binhai New Area in China, now a manufacturing powerhouse, was once salt farms and marshland. As you can see, the growth, which began in 1990, has extended into the Bohai Sea and is only expected to continue as the area becomes integrated into the Jing-Jin-Ji megalopolis. The delta where the Omo river meets Africa’s Lake Turkana used to be contained entirely within Ethiopia, but it’s grown so big it’s now located mainly in Kenya. It’s expanded as the lake’s water level has been reduced by less rain, higher temperatures, and agricultural activity. And here we have an extremely remote area in the harsh conditions of Kazakhstan near the Caspian Sea which shows the development of production facilities to take advantage of oil and gas deposits. Those settlements you see are to house workers, which demonstrates the lengths humans will go for a good paying job. And then we have Iran’s lake Urmia which changed color from green to red in a matter of weeks last summer. The culprit? A combination of algae and bacteria that causes the change when the weather gets hot and the lake begins to evaporate, increasing its salinity, or saltiness. Well I hope this gave you a little more appreciation for the natural world surrounding you wherever you find yourself watching this video. Until next time, for TDC, I’m Bryce Plank.
Views: 157700 The Daily Conversation
15 Photos Nasa Doesn't Want You to See
 
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From strange images captured by the mars rover, to some unbelievable rocket engineering mistakes, here are 15 strange photos nasa doesn’t want you to see! Subscribe to American Eye http://goo.gl/GBphkv 5. Aral Sea Nasa probably doesn’t want you to see these satellite shots of the aral sea. The entire lake that was once the 4th largest in the world disappearing should not happen. The water level decreased so quickly, that wreckage of fishing boats like this photo are in the dry lake bed! Unbelievable ideas from Soviet engineers were to begin diverting the water in order to build cotton plantations. The Aral lost a huge amount of water due to evaporation that will never be replaced. This has negatively affected nearby countries like Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. It’s basically now a dry, salty, toxic wasteland with soil that contains chemicals from weapons testing, pesticides, and fertilizers. We doubt anyone will be able to grow anything here anymore. 4. The White Knight Satellite UFO hunters went into a frenzy when they saw this mysterious white orb floating in the sky during the endeavor mission in 2011. As the massive fuel tank was heading back to earth, a mysterious, almost metallic looking object comes into view. Is it a floating plastic bag? Possible some space junk, or a piece of paper let out by one of the people on the shuttle? Some thought it was a parachute at first but nasa doesn’t really use parachutes for their external fuel tanks and just kind of let them get burnt up in the atmosphere. 3. UFO Refueling The sun is a star that is responsible for a majority of the energy in our solar system and without it, humans could not survive on planet earth. Is it a little bit too far fetched to believe that some spacecraft might have found a way to harness the sun’s power. Or are they trying to alter it, in order to destroy us? About 6-7 years ago, Russian scientists claim to have spotted strange UFOs everyday near the sun. These bizarre images spotted by the Solar Heliospheric Observatory shows orbs just floating around the sun! What could they possibly be. As ufologists begin to study photos of NASA, they are able to spot strange things like this. Their theory is that they may be able to control the sun's temperature or that they are using the sun to harvest some type of rare powerful element.
Views: 191493 American Eye
NASA satellite images show Aral Sea basin 'completely dried'
 
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An area of the Central Asian inland sea, once the fourth largest in the world, was left parched in August, according to Nasa photographs. The Aral Sea has been retreating over the last half-century since a massive Soviet irrigation project diverted water from the rivers that fed it into farmland. Images taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on Nasa's Terra satellite. euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
Views: 21983 euronews Knowledge
Aral Sea Before and After 2010 :  Exclusive Video [HD]
 
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Aral Sea Before and After 2010 : Exclusive Video
Views: 136042 saltmovie2010
Why is the Aral Sea shrinking
 
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How big does a body of water need to be to be called a SEA? Here I take a quick look at, Why is the Aral sea shrinking?-- All images used are public domain; licensed under Creative Commons with attribution; or used with permission. https://www.thoughtco.com/is-the-aral-sea-shrinking-1434959 http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/ogmius/archives/issue_19/aral_sea.html https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Syrdaryamap.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Amudaryamap.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aral_Sea.gif http://dewantoedi.net/contoh-contoh-kerentanan/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:POTD/2016-05-24 Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 366 mrgeocjhs
Post Animal - Aral Sea
 
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a Rock & Roll band from Chicago Check out their good shit: https://postanimal.bandcamp.com/ Buy Aral Sea: https://postanimal.bandcamp.com/track/aral-sea Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/postanimal/ Instagram: @postanimal Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxm11rMvAIGSBTST_Lsxp-Q Photo credit: @scragmachine on instagram
Views: 17287 grewv
14 Mysterious and Secretive Soviet Projects
 
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From secretive secretive cities you're not allowed to go to, nuclear powered aircraft, here are 14 mysterious and secretive soviet projects Subscribe to American EYE! 4. Vozrozhdeniya Island (voz-roz-den-ay) This island is located on what was the Aral sea before it disappeared mysteriously. It was here where the Soviet Union constructed a top secret biological weapons testing facility called Aralsk-7. Explore this place on google maps and you’ll find some eery ghost towns and abandoned places. This began the main laboratory where crews tested multiple effects of fatal diseases and how to spread them effectively.They worked with horrific agents including, anthrax, smallpox, the black plague, and more. In 1971, weaponized smallpox was accidently released,3 people and infecting 10. Oops. Due to the shrinking of the Aral sea, the island is more of a peninsula. Many claim there are still large stockpiles of anthrax buried here after the facility closed in 1990 and after 911 an effort was made to find it. Anthrax spores can survive underground for decades, so if you come here, bring some hand sanitizer and a hazmat suit! 3. Tu-95LAL Nuclear Aircraft During the cold war, numerous aircraft were experimented with. With this being the cold war, nuclear power it seemed perfectly reasonable to see if nuclear power could be used to fuel an aircraft. We do have submarines that use nuclear power and even aircraft carriers, so why not a plane? Both the US and Soviets considered the possibility. The soviets built a prototype that was known as the TU-95LAL. The nuclear reactor was placed in the fuselage where there was a small bulge that you can see in this photo. It conducted over 40 test flights but with the nuclear reactor turned off a majority of the time. Many believe the project was abandoned because they couldn’t find a proper way to shield the radioactivity of the reactor and they realized a crash might could result in a nuclear explosion on a valuable runway. 2. The Battle Mole Imagine a vehicle that could travel through water, on land and go underground by mechanically drilling its way to it’s next target! Sounds pretty insane right? The soviets had an interesting idea with this one. Also known as the Subterrene, this experiment vehicle could successfully move underground at a speed of about 3 miles an hour. The goal of it would be to travel underground, detonate explosives under enemy military installations, which would then cause an earthquake and destroy a bunch of things up above. It also ran on Nuclear power and the first test proved to be successful, destroying an test target bunker covering a range of 6 miles. Everyone was quite amazed and they thought they came up with some kind of secret super device. They were wrong, during the 2nd test, the whole thing blew up and it was never tested again 1. Tsar Bomba The largest nuclear bomb ever dropped was tested by the Russians in 1961 in the Novaya Zemlya archipelago. The bomb was extremely large in size as well, weigh 27 metric tons and measuring in a 8 meters long by 2 meters in diameter. A bomb this large isn’t really too useful considering the best method to destroy would be to use many bombs scattered across a large range.. The largest nuclear device tested by Americas was equivalent to 15 megatons of TNT while this bomb dropped in Russia yielded 57 megatons. The blast was so powerful that it almost killed the pilot who was flying the plane. It’s been described as the single most physically powerful device ever used by mankind and the mushroom cloud you see in this photo is rather shocking to say the least.
Views: 15987 American Eye
Top 10 Worst Man Made Environmental Disasters
 
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Top 10 Worst Man Made Environmental Disasters // Subscribe: http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD // The images in this video are powered by www.gettyimages.com The worst environmental disasters that took a serious toll on the environment and human life. WatchMojo presents the top 10 worst disasters to the environment to be caused by humans. But what will take the top spot on our list? Will it be the Kuwaiti Oil Fires, the Ecocide of Vietnam, or the Chernobyl Disaster? Watch to find out! 00:31 #10. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill 01:20 #9. The Shrinking of the Aral Sea 01:52 #8. Bhopal Disaster 02:32 #7. Electronic Waste in Guiyu, China 03:14 #6. Great Smog of London 03:47 #5. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill 04:31 #4. Castle Bravo 05:14 #3, #2, #1 ???? For more amazing images by Getty, check out www.gettyimages.com and https://www.instagram.com/gettyimages/ To help decide what top 10 list we make next, check out the suggest page here: http://www.watchmojo.com/my/suggest.php Our Magazine!! Learn the inner workings of WatchMojo and meet the voices behind the videos, articles by our specialists from gaming, film, tv, anime and more. VIEW INSTANTLY: http://goo.gl/SivjcX WatchMojo's Social Media Pages http://www.Facebook.com/WatchMojo http://www.Twitter.com/WatchMojo http://instagram.com/watchmojo Get WatchMojo merchandise at shop.watchmojo.com WatchMojo’s ten thousand videos on Top 10 lists, Origins, Biographies, Tips, How To’s, Reviews, Commentary and more on Pop Culture, Celebrity, Movies, Music, TV, Film, Video Games, Politics, News, Comics, Superheroes. Your trusted authority on ranking Pop Culture.
Views: 151189 WatchMojo.com
Aral Sea 1976-2008
 
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Here is Aral Sea change 1976 to 2008. Photo source by Google Earth
Views: 9249 Somewin14
जब सूखा दुनिया का सबसे बड़ा सागर तो सामने आयी हैरान करने वाली सच्चाई
 
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The extent of Aral Sagar present between Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan has dried up, it is enough to tell these pictures. In the last 50 years, 90 percent of the world's fourth largest sea or Aral Sea has dried up. There was also a time when this sea of ​​1,534 islands was called the ocean of the islands. The event of drying of the Aral Sea is believed to be one of the biggest environmental disasters in the world. From the 1960s, the process of drying started from the ocean and by 1997, the Aral Sea was divided into four lakes. It was named after the Northern Aral Sea, the Eastern Basin, the Western Basin and the largest part of the Southern Aral Sea. By the year 2009, the south-eastern part of the ocean went completely dry and the south-western part became a thin strip. The most harmful damage to the ocean is its phishing industry. The phishing industry was completely destroyed, due to which the phase of unemployment and economic crisis started. Due to the drying of the water, the polution has increased and people living in the area of ​​Aral Sagar are struggling with health related problems. It has also had tremendous impact on the weather. Both heat or cold are wreaking havoc.
Views: 232 MEXA NEWS
Pink Floyd - Louder Than Words (Official Music Video)
 
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'Louder Than Words' is from Pink Floyd's last album 'The Endless River'. Order now: CD - http://smarturl.it/TERCD Digital - http://smarturl.it/TERdigital Vinyl - http://smarturl.it/TERvinyl Deluxe digital - http://smarturl.it/TERdeluxedigital Deluxe CD + Blu-ray - http://smarturl.it/TERdeluxeBR Deluxe CD + DVD - http://smarturl.it/TERdeluxeDVD #TheEndlessRiver THE EARLY YEARS + OUT NOW http://smarturl.it/TEY + 6 Individual Volumes available as Multi-disc Book-bound packages + Featuring Rare Tracks, Demos, Interviews, and Film Footage + Each ‘Year’ CD, DVD & Blu-Ray package includes Photo Book & Memorabilia Facebook http://smarturl.it/PF_FB Twitter http://smarturl.it/PF_Twitter Instagram http://smarturl.it/PF_Instagram Spotify http://smarturl.it/PF_Spotify YouTube http://smarturl.it/PF_YT Apple http://smarturl.it/PF_Apple
Views: 15890158 Pink Floyd
19 Most Famous Shipwrecks
 
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After a life at sea, where do ships and submarines go when they retire? Why, they haunt still shores or stayed beached on dry land as they slowly rust and erode. Here are some of the most famous shipwrecks where they ended up. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10. Sleeping Bear The shipwrecks found beneath the water’s surface in Sleeping Bear on located near the Lower Peninsula of Lake MIchigan. A famous ship found here was the Francisco Morazan, which sailed off from the city of Chicago back in 1960. There was over 940 tons of cargo when it was met with fog and snow, which proved too much for the ship. In the end, it was abandoned by the next month, which left the ship to just sink and rust into the lake waters since the owners of the ship were never found and there was no one to deal with the removal of it from the water. 9. Landévennec This ship yard is located along the Aulne River in north west France. Most of the ships seen here are military vessels near Pen Forn. The mountains surrounding the waters not only help it the site from being an eyesore, but their presence apparently help keep the water calm, ultimately making for a smoother decomposition of the old ships to disintegrate better. 8. Alexandrovsk-Sakhalinsky On the shores of this Russian town are lines of old submarines that sit decomposing in the water. These abandoned submarines are partially sunk in the water as they just await to rust. No one is sure just how many submarines can be found in these waters, nor is much else known about their condition or purpose. 7. Bikini Atoll Bikini Atoll is known as being a nuclear testing site, and it’s also a location where ships have sunk, creating an old shipyard site for the old sea vessels. The ships were part of atomic tests during the 1940s, one such being the USS Independence. Not only that, but there’s aid to be over 55 gallons of radioactive waste in drums dumped here as well. The USS Saratoga lies here as well, with a lot of the vessels found here having been forgotten about. 6. Sha’b Abu Nuhas In the depths of the Red Sea is a location referred to as the Wrecks of Abu Nuhas. It is the site of at least 7 shipwrecks that lie near the triangle shaped coral reef near the north western part of Shadwan Island. Of the ships were is the SS Carnatic, Olden, Kimon M, and as seen pictured here, The Giannis D. Divers come here all the time to check out the metal ruins of old ships that have met their demise in the open waters. Along with the rusted metal is a diverse amount of wildlife that also makes it a popular diving site. 5. Jervois Basin This body of water is seen an unfit for swimming, but that doesn’t stop people from checking out the wrecks found at the Jervois Basin in South Australia near the upper region of Port Adelaide River. Here you can see the skeletal remains of old ships in the process of ship breaking. It’s not the active ship breaking yard it once ways, and remnants of that part of history can still be seen here. 4. Curtin Artificial Reef It is one of the largest Reef Projects in the world and has been a site of wrecked sea vessels since 1968. Since then there have been over 32 ships, buoys, cars, and other pieces of vehicles and vessels that have been allowed to sink and become part of the reef. This shipwreck in Australia was established by the Underwater Research Group of Queensland and is a project that has attracted much more marine life to the waters. 3. Aral Sea The dry sand pictured here would be the last place you think you’d see so many ships come together as they sit all run down in the sun, and yet the ships on the Aral Sea are some of the most prominent and famous in the world. Located in a basin in the border of the countries of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, the shipwrecks of the Aral Sea have been a strange sight to behold ever since the level of the sea started to rapidly decline by the 1960s. 2. Skeleton Coast If these skull and crossbones gates are anything to go by, it the fact that Skeleton Coast in Namibia are one of the most well known shipwrecks in the world. Skeleton Coast is found along the coast of Namibia along a coast that touches that Atlantic Ocean. Rusted ships have been beached here, the environment rusting and breaking them down to seem like skeletal formations along the beach. Gadani This is one of the top 3 largest ship breaking yards in the world and is still one of the most active. Gadani, located 50 miles northwest of Karachi, Pakistan, is a yard that is the location of 132 ship breaking plots. A few decades ago, it was the largest ship breaking yard in the world, and even now that it has been surpassed on that front, it is still one of the most well known and leads the world in its ship breaking efficiency.
Views: 1144494 Talltanic
Shocking timelapse of the shrinking Aral Sea
 
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NASA's latest video shows the world's once 4th largest lake shrinking steadily
Views: 3402 WION
Satellite photos show one of the world's largest lakes disappearing
 
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Satellite images from NASA show that over the last 14 years, one of the world's largest inland bodies of water, the Aral Sea in Central Asia, has almost completely dried up and disappeared.The Aral Sea -- once the fourth-largest lake in the world -- has been shrinking since the 1960s, when the Soviet Union began diverting its waters to irrigate surrounding areas and transform the deserts of Kazakhstan, Uzbekisan and Turkmenistan into crop land. The changes are dramatically documented in a series of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite.By2000, when this sequence of satellite photos begins, a large portion of the sea had already been drained. Instead of a single large body of water, there were now two smaller ones: the Northern and Southern Aral Seas. The Southern Aral Sea shrunk further into two lobes connected by narrow channels at the top and bottom. In ensuing years, the lobes get smaller and smaller. A drought from 2005 to 2009 accelerated the changes, NASA says. Also in 2005, Kazakhstan completed a dam project aimed at shoring up water supplies in the Northern Aral Sea at the expense of the southern portion. The most recent photo, from August 2014, shows just a thin sliver of water remaining on its western edge.The loss of the once-great body of water has devastated the fishing communities that used to flourish along its banks. The sea's disappearance left behind dry, salty sand and dust, which have degraded nearby farmland and caused respiratory illness in local residents. According to NASA, the loss of the water's moderating influence has also led to more extreme temperatures in the region, making winters colder and summers hotter and drier.
Views: 4862 Foxy News
Earth Engine Timelapse Dead Sea
 
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After observing the recorded images, we note that the flow of water drained into the Dead Sea decreases from one year to the next.
Views: 1027 Géo Tech
सूख गया दुनिया का सबसे बड़ा सागर, जहाजों को नहीं मिला आगे का रास्ता...
 
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सूख गया दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा सागर, जहाजों को नहीं मिला आगे का रास्ता... Watch This Video :- https://youtu.be/HhY_no3pxPY The extent of Aral Sagar present between Kazakhstan and Northern Uzbekistan has dried up, it is enough to tell these pictures. In the last 50 years, 90 percent of the world's fourth largest sea or Aral Sea has dried up. There was also a time when this sea of ​​1,534 islands was called the ocean of the islands. The event of drying of the Aral Sea is believed to be one of the biggest environmental disasters in the world. From the 1960s, the process of drying started from the ocean and by 1997, the Aral Sea was divided into four lakes. It was named after the Northern Aral Sea, the Eastern Basin, the Western Basin and the largest part of the Southern Aral Sea. By the year 2009, the south-eastern part of the ocean was completely dry. And the south-western part is transformed into a thin strip. The most harmful damage to the ocean is its phishing industry. The phishing industry was completely destroyed, due to which the phase of unemployment and economic crisis started. Due to the drying of the water, the polution has increased and people living in the area of ​​Aral Sagar are struggling with health related problems. It has also had tremendous impact on the weather. Both heat or cold are wreaking havoc. Drying of this ocean started from a Soviet project. The flow of rivers for the Soviet Union's Irrigation Project was changed in 1960, after which the process of drying of this ocean continues. The dam project of Kazakhstan was completed in 2005, to save the sea from drying and its parts to fill the North Aral Sea, after which the level of water in the ocean rose to 12 meters in 2003 compared to 2003. However, despite all this, the situation of the ocean could not be improved much. Subscribe Us for Latest News & Updates ► https://goo.gl/K8pjDQ Stay Connected with Us : Follow Us On Facebook ► https://goo.gl/GEkOqP Follow Us On Twitter ► https://twitter.com/hjnews4u Follow Us On Google plus ► https://goo.gl/LZglUF HJ NEWS !! HJ NEWS outbreaks the conventional news reading and brings to you the real face of every information at one click! Latest news from India and the world, politics and nation, entertainment, sports and science. Witness the panoramic vision of the state on every aspect you can think of! It is easy for every person to watch the news in form of video rather than reading every sentance.. So, Friends Please Watch , Like , Share & Subscribe HJ NEWS
Views: 4305 HJ NEWS
"Otto Shmidt" ship in Aral sea
 
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НИС "Отто Шмидт"
Views: 314 ArchiFrecce
Aral Sea
 
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Written by Theresa Rule for the multi-media Climate Change art exhibition 'This Changes Everything'. Edited and Scored by Oslo Iversen. Performed by Jon Fredrik Andersen Wazi Dzulkifli Dixon James Jo Kluger Lucia Gracia Marquez Xavier Rule Charlotte Teschner
Aral Sea documentary
 
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The Aral Sea is an example environmental catastrophe caused by human actions. The lake has been steadily shrinking since the 1960s, and by 2007 it declined to only 10% of its original size. Read more on http://www.crisiswatch.net/environment/AralSea.html
Views: 13235 CwnEnvironment
Unbelievable landscape and undergroud mosques | Between the Seas in Kazakhstan
 
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Have you followed our expeditions on social media? This is our fifth route - From the Sea to the Sea, which covered Mangistau, Aktobe and Kyzylorda regions in the south-west part of Kazakhstan mostly between the Aral Sea and the Caspian Sea. *** A month ago, the largest expedition to the regions of Kazakhstan - #ulydalatravel came to its end. The expedition covered 6 routes from July 18 to September 29, 2018. The expedition participants got over more than 17,000 kilometers, visited 11 regions of Kazakhstan, 12 national nature parks and more than 130 travel locations. Over 150 people participated in the exhibition, including professional guides, experienced travellers, journalists, travel bloggers, deputies, media personalities, the crew of Kazakh TV channel and the team of National Geographic Russia. As a result, new travel routes were formed, a photo and video bank about the country's natural objects was created, and information about their condition was updated. Now the route and detailed information about it is available for travellers #traveltokazakhstan #ulydalatravel #20летиеастаны #kazakhtourism
Views: 517 Kazakhstan Travel
A Predictable Catastrophe - the history of the Aral Sea, an excerpt
 
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The Aral Sea in Central Asia was once the fourth biggest inland sea in the world. But a mastodon of a vision took form: water from the Sea was to transform the never-ending desert steppe into blooming fields of cotton. But the vision had a serious impact on the surrounding communities. The documentary is part of the international awarded series "Late Lessons from Early Warnings" which explores how we have been able to respond to warnings about the hazards posed by some of the greatest technological innovations of the last century. We have not always been that successful. Directed and produced by Jakob Gottshau, Express TV Production Photography: Michael Daugaard Film Editing: Jesper Osmund Music: Niels Mosumgaard Narration: Brian Patterson Year of Production: 2006 Watch more: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bz8IFlfcBZ0oR0lYRTQ1SmpKeXc/edit?usp=sharing
Views: 4253 Jakob Gottschau
The Shrinking Aral Sea - World's Worst Environmental Disasters★★★
 
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The Aral Sea formed about 5.5 million years ago in the area of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Central Asia. Formerly one of the four largest lakes in the world with an area of 26,300 square miles, the Aral Sea has been steadily shrinking since the 1960's. The shrinking of the Aral Sea has been called "one of the planet's worst environmental disasters". Visit us at: http://funnysillyamazing.blogspot.com Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/FunSillyAmazing Music Credit: Dream Culture Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Link to online music license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Intro Sound effects credit: Intro Music credit: Introspectral - John Ekelov 99 Sounds of Tenelach Link to online music license:http://99sounds.org/samples-of-tenalach/
Views: 4278 Funny Silly Amazing
Aral Sea Dried Up
 
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The Aral Sea is one of worst environmental disasters on earth. The fourth largest lake on earth (400 miles long) is all gone now. The old Soviet Union dammed up the two rivers flowing into the lake, which prevented the rivers from replenishing the lake water that evaporated in the hot climate. The entire fishing-based economy collapsed, resulting in most of the people moving and the cities dying.
Views: 188 Joseph Holliday
Earth: Planet of Altered States
 
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Natural and human-caused change captured in these extraordinary image sequences covering years and decades of time. Read about the individual sequences on: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/WorldOfChange/index.php Earth is constantly changing. Some changes are a natural part of the climate system, such as the seasonal expansion and contraction of the Arctic sea ice pack. The responsibility for other changes, such as the Antarctic ozone hole, falls squarely on humanity's shoulders. NASA's World of Change series documents how our planet's land, oceans, atmosphere, and Sun are changing over time. Mt. St. Helens The devastation of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mt. St. Helens and the gradual recovery of the surrounding landscape is documented in this series of satellite images from 1979--2009. Aral Sea A massive irrigation project in the Kyzylkum Desert of central Asia has devastated the Aral Sea over the past 50 years. These images show the continued decline of the Southern Aral Sea in the past decade, as well as the first steps of recovery in the Northern Aral Sea in recent years. Dubai To expand the possibilities for beachfront tourist development, Dubai, part of the United Arab Emirates, undertook a massive engineering project to create hundreds of artificial islands along its Persian Gulf coastline. Yellowstone In 1988, wildfires raced through Yellowstone National Park, consuming hundreds of thousands of acres. This series of Landsat images tracks the landscape's slow recovery through 2008. Southeast Australia Drought has taken a severe toll on croplands in Southeast Australia during many years this decade. Colorado River Combined with human demands, a multi-year drought in the Upper Colorado River Basin caused a dramatic drop in the Colorado River's Lake Powell in the early part of the 2000 decade. The lake began to recover in the latter part of the decade, but as of May 2010, it was still less than 60 percent of capacity. Antarctica In the early 1980s, scientists began to realize that CFCs were creating a thin spot—a hole—in the ozone layer over Antarctica every spring. This series of satellite images shows the ozone hole on the day of its maximum depth each year from 1979 through 2008. Amazon The state of Rondônia in western Brazil is one of the most deforested parts of the Amazon. This series shows deforestation on the frontier in the northwestern part of the state between 2000 and 2008. Larsen B Ice Shelf In early 2002, scientists monitoring daily satellite images of the Antarctic Peninsula watched in amazement as almost the entire Larsen B Ice Shelf splintered and collapsed in just over one month. They had never witnessed such a large area disintegrate so rapidly. West Virginia Based on data from NASA's Landsat 5 satellite, these natural-color (photo-like) images document the growth of the Hobet mine in Boone County, West Virginia, as it expands from ridge to ridge between 1984 to 2009. Iraq In the years following the Second Gulf War, Iraqi residents began reclaiming the country's nearly decimated Mesopotamian marshes. This series of images documents the transformation of the fabled landscape between 2000 and 2009. Yellow River Delta Once free to wander up and down the coast of the North China Plain, the Yellow River Delta has been shaped by levees, canals, and jetties in recent decades.
Views: 40580 SpaceRip
Aral Sea Disappearing  - Time Lapse
 
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Time Lapse of the Aral Sea, Uzbekistan/Kazakhstan Evaporating.
Views: 4895 GeoEngine

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