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Product Discovery Anti-Patterns (Hands on Agile Webinar #1)
 
22:52
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube Scrum has proven to be a practical product delivery framework for digital products like applications or apps. However, Scrum is equally suited to build the wrong product efficiently as its Achilles heel has always been the product discovery part. What product discovery part, you may think now. And this is precisely the point: The product owner miraculously identifies what the best way to proceed as a team by gating and prioritizing the product backlog is. From sunk costs, HIPPO-ism, my-budget-my-features to self-fulfilling prophecies - learn more about the numerous product discovery anti-patterns that can manifest themselves when you try to fill Scrum's product discovery void. HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-product-discovery/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello, everybody. Welcome to the first Hands-On Agile Webinar. I'm your host Stefan Wolpers, and today we will be talking about product discovery anti-patterns. The first one basically everyone knows, it 'my budget, my feature.' Think Jira monkeys and coders. The product department is more treated like an internal agency, and stakeholders pursue the, "we pay for you," approach. Number two, speaking of silos, for example, marketing or sales, insist on channeling communication with customers and users. Their sales people are preventing [the product team] from talking directly with customers, which is making user interviews and user research very problematic. Number three, coders code. Engineers are supposed to deliver code and nothing else. They are not supposed to, for example, talk to customers, very often under the label that coders are too expensive and too scarce and they shouldn't waste time on talking to customers. I believe this is pure Taylorism at work. It's entirely output oriented. Number four, okay, as a product team we shouldn't assume a victim role here. We also contribute in some form or another to this whole product discovery anti-pattern process. For example, there's one issue that regularly triggers frustration on the side of the stakeholders if we are not transparent about how we work. Next category: personal issues. So, personal agendas, I don't think we have to talk about it in detail. Pet projects: pet projects are stakeholder driven. However, they do not exclusively apply to the middle management. You can also think of gold plating as an engineering approach, or why an exotic new technology suddenly becomes a part of the tech stack. A root-cause analysis will probably point to the "what is in it for me?" syndrome with one or more stakeholders. Number six, HiPPOism. HiPPO stands for highest-paid person's opinion, and there's the famous quote of Jim Barksdale of Netscape, "If we have data, let's go with the data. If all we have are opinions, let's go with mine." However, there's no scientific proof that the pay grade of an individual is linked to his or her ability to identify what's worth building. Number seven, bonus at risk: the misalignment between individual incentives on the one side and the team objective on the other side. Shortly before the end of the bonus period, the product team gets swamped with must-have requirements from sales. Psychological issues, the third and most interesting category of product discovery anti-patterns. The sunk cost fallacy, number eight. We believe that we make rational decisions most of the time. In fact, we're often only rationalizing them afterward. Substitution, number nine. Another piece from Kahneman's book. Kahneman's system number one tends to deliver answers to most of the questions that come to your mind very quickly. Now, for example, consider the question, "How's your life nowadays," which would require you to reflect on and analyze. That's actually another part of your brain. Yet, you come up with an answer immediately. The trick here is that the brain's actually not answering this complicated question, but it's answering a related question. For example, "How was your mood today?" and takes this substitute question as the ground for the belief that you answered the original question. #10 - Validating your solution: This self-fulfilling prophecy is closely related to the "I know what we have to build" issue we just talked about. With the best intentions, you want to validate your hypothesis and solution, you are data-driven, right? Survivorship bias, number 11. Survivorship bias or survival bias is the logical error of concentrating on the people or things that made it in the past through some selection process, and overlook at the same time what didn't happen, typically because of a lack of visibility. The last one, number 12: psychological distance. Steve Jobs once said, "It's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times people don't know what they want until you show it to them."
Views: 1732 Age of Product
Hands-on Agile Webinar #4: Agile Failure Patterns 2.0
 
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Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile webinar 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome: 1. The lack of a vision. 2. Is ‘agile’ is a fad or a trend? 3. Projects, budgets, and stage-gates: my budget, my feature. 4. The lack of a failure culture. 5. The efficiency and utilization focus. 6. No rapid build-test-learn culture. 7. The ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. 8. Taylorism and the resulting micromanagement. 9. Misaligned incentives. 10. Outdated technology stacks. 11. Team building issues. 12. Inadequate facilities. HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 1327 Age of Product
Scrum Master Anti-Patterns — (Hands-on Agile Webinar #8)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join more than 20,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar Scrum Master anti-patterns: from the agile manager to the team secretary to dogmatism. Let us start with a short refresher from the Scrum Guide. According to it, the “Scrum Master is responsible for promoting and supporting Scrum as defined in the Scrum Guide. Scrum Masters do this by helping everyone understand the theory, practices, rules, and values of Scrum. The Scrum Master is a servant-leader for the Scrum Team.” Finally, the “Scrum Master helps those outside the Scrum Team understand which of their interactions with the Scrum Team are helpful and which aren’t. The Scrum Master helps everyone change these interactions to maximize the value created by the Scrum Team.” (1) The first Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the agile manager. Self-organization does not mean the absence of management: why handle pay-role as a Scrum Team? Outsourcing of tasks to the management is hence common. However, Scrum is by all means not about exercising command & control; the Scrum master is not a supervisor. (2) The second Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the Scrum team secretary and Scrum parents. The Scrum parent is generally shielding the team from the cold and cruel world, creating a safe & happy agile bubble. (3) The third Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the imposter. Dolla, dolla, bill ya'll—the Scrum Master imposter believes that this agile/scrum thingy is a fad—how hard can it be, the Scrum Guide is just 17 pages. (4) The fourth Scrum Master anti-pattern covers Scrum dogmatism. The Scrum Master enjoys teaching (and never leaves the Shu-phase). (5) The fifth Scrum Master anti-pattern covers failing at the capacity game. The Scrum master does not address the necessity of slack time by fighting the push for 100% utilization. (6) The sixth Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the flow undermining Scrum Master. The Scrum Master allows stakeholders to disrupt the flow of the development team during the sprint. (7) The seventh Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the Scrum Master with a metrics fetish, pursuing flawed metrics. The Scrum Master keeps track of individual performance metrics such as story points per developer per sprint. (8) The eighth Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the Scrum Master ignoring Scrum values. As the Scrum Guide puts it: “When the scrum values of commitment, courage, focus, openness, and respect are embodied and lived by the Scrum Team, the Scrum pillars of transparency, inspection, and adaptation come to life and build trust for everyone. Successful use of Scrum depends on people becoming more proficient in living these five values.” (9) The ninth Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the skipped Retrospective. All Scrum events are essential for a team’s success—you cannot skip any event. Junior Scrum teams may be tempted to skip Retrospectives to buy some more time to meet the sprint goal. (10) The tenth Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the Groundhog-Day retrospective. The retrospective never changes in composition, venue, or length. In this case that the team will likely revisit the same issues over and over again—it’s groundhog day without the happy ending, though, an empty ritual. (11) The eleventh Scrum Master anti-pattern covers the manager alert at retrospectives. The Scrum Master permits stakeholders and worse–line managers—to participate in the team retrospective. In this case, the team should refuse to participate. (12) The twelveth Scrum Master anti-pattern provides food for thought: what if your scrum master is frustrated? The Scrum Master has been working his or her butt off for months, but the team is not responding to the effort: Pearls before swine? (SUMMARY) The last chapter summarizes my dirty dozen of Scrum Master anti-patterns: from ill-suited personal traits and the pursuit of individual agendas to frustration with the team itself. Don’t miss the next Hands-on Agile mini-series and subscribe to this Youtube channel. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 20,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Scrum Master Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-scrum-master/ SLIDEDECK:
Views: 920 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile webinar addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns CONTENT: (1) The first anti-pattern covers the oversized product backlog: The product backlog contains more items than the scrum team can deliver within three to four sprints. This way the product owner creates waste by hoarding issues that might never materialize. The product owner is probably using the product backlog as a repository of ideas and requirements. (This practice is clogging the product backlog, may lead to a cognitive overload and makes alignment with the ‘big picture’ at portfolio management and roadmap planning level very tough.) (2) The second anti-pattern covers creating the product backlog in the wrong way: The product owner treats product backlog items not as a token for discussion to build a shared understanding of the why, how, and what with the team, but as deliverables. Often, the PO creates product backlog items upfront by copying from requirement documents without including other members of the scrum team. (3) The third anti-pattern covers the weak product owner: The PO has not learned to say no to stakeholders demanding new requests. Trying to being everybody’s darling creates mediocre products that do not scale, though. It also defies the product owner’s most important duty: protecting the product backlog from tasks with little or no value. (4) The fourth anti-pattern covers prioritization by proxy: A single stakeholder or a committee of stakeholder prioritizes the product backlog — not the product owner. (The strength of Scrum is building on the strong position of the product owner. The product owner is the only person to decide what tasks become product backlog items. Hence, the product owner also decides on the priority. Take away that empowerment, and Scrum turns into a pretty robust waterfall 2.0 process.) (5) The fifth anti-pattern covers the omniscient product owner: The PO does not involve stakeholders or subject matter experts in the refinement process, and probably not even the Scrum team. (6) The sixth episode covers the lack of a sprint goal: The product owner cannot provide a sprint goal, or the chosen sprint goal is flawed. (7) The seventh anti-pattern covers the pushy PO: The product owner pushes the development team to take on more tasks than it could realistically handle. Probably, the product owner is referring to former team metrics such as velocity to support his or her desire. (8) The eighth anti-pattern covers how the product owner might be toying with the definition of ready. The PO tries to squeeze in some last-minute user stories that do not meet the definition of ready. (9) The ninth anti-pattern covers the absent product owner. If the PO is not available for immediate clarification, he or she will create artificial queues that probably will put the scrum team’s sprint goal at risk. (10) The tenth anti-pattern covers the product owner who cannot let go product backlog items once they become sprint backlog items. (11) The eleventh anti-pattern covers the selfish product owner, presenting “his or her” accomplishments to the stakeholders. (12) The twelveth anti-pattern covers the unapproachable, the broadcasting product owner.
Views: 838 Age of Product
Agile Maturity and Agility Assessment: Is Agile a Fad or Trend? (Hands-on Agile Webinar #2)
 
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Join 18,000 peers for the largest NEWSLETTER on Agile: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-maturity/ HOST: Stefan Wolpers DESCRIPTION: Is agile maturity a fad or a trend? How can an organization make an informed decision on what level of agility might become achievable before starting a transition? Our second webinar addressed the question of agile maturity and detailed the survey results what indicates an agile organization. Moreover, we introduced the ‘Agility Assessment Framework’ open source project which aims to provide agile practitioners with the tools needed to answer these questions. The second webinar addressed the question of agile maturity and detailed the survey results what indicates an agile organization. Moreover, we introduced the ‘Agility Assessment Framework’ open source project which aims to provide agile practitioners with the tools needed to answer these questions. I'm seriously tired of listening to people telling me, "Agile doesn't work here. We tried, and we failed," for whatever reason. "It's a hoax. It's a fad. Why would I do this?" I believe that this has a lot to do with the agile Industrial consulting complex because agile has become such a tremendously lucrative business. I've been tracking the number of Scrum Alliance, the certified scrum trainers, and the number of Scrum Alliance members. If you do the math, being a certified Scrum trainer should net you via certification workshops perhaps about half a million dollars a year. We have people like the good people from SAFe® who sell some kind of package agile very successfully. So, it's a lucrative business. The first thing you learn in a consulting firm is that when you start selling something to your customer, you sell something that you already have worked out from your drawer. So, basically you like patterns, frameworks, methodologies--even better because you can pull out the checklist, and you know exactly how much you can charge the client, and how this is all going down. I believe this is the wrong approach. We need to figure out for every organization what might work in the long run, where the company might get to. One size fits all doesn't work. Let's start at the beginning. Why do organizations want to become agile? I don't know who of you have read Jeff Sutherland's theory of doing twice the work in half the time, which I believe is still a very problematic title for the whole thing. It results in answers from the C-level when you ask them why they want to become agile that they want to be more efficient. They want to have more bang for the buck. They want to deliver more and faster at a better level of predictability.
Views: 940 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (1) — No Sprint Goal (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the lack of a sprint goal: The product owner cannot provide a sprint goal, or the chosen sprint goal is flawed. An original sprint goal answers the “What are we fighting for?” question. It is a negotiation between the product owner and the development team. It is focused and measurable, as sprint goal and team forecast go hand in hand. Lastly, the sprint goal is a useful calibration for the upcoming sprint.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 319 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Anti-Patterns (Hands-on Agile Webinar #7)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. Let us start with a short refresher from the Scrum Guide. The purpose of the sprint is to deliver a potentially releasable product increment. It is time-box of less than a month but more than one week. No changes are made to the sprint backlog that would endanger the Sprint Goal, but the scope may be clarified and re-negotiated between the PO and Development Team as more is learned. The quality goals do not decrease. (1) The first episode covers the absent Product Owner: This means no feedback to developers during the sprint thus increasing the risk of not meeting the sprint goal. (2) The second episode covers the interfering Product Owner: You can change the sprint backlog—if the development team agrees—as the sprint backlog is not static. (3) The third episode covers scope-stretching or gold-plating: The development team increases the scope of the sprint by adding unnecessary work to sprint backlog items. For example, the development team enlarges a task without prior consulting of the Product Owner. (4) The fourth episode covers out-of-date sprint boards: The development team does not update tickets on the board in time to reflect their current statuses. No matter if it is a physical or digital board, it is vital for coordinating a team’s work. An up-to-date board is also an integral part of the communication of the Scrum team with its stakeholders. A board that is not up-to-date will impact the trust the stakeholders have in the scrum team: “How shall they deliver software if they already fail at moving a few stickies?” (5) The fifth episode covers the flow undermining Scrum Master: The Scrum Master allows stakeholders to disrupt the flow of the development team during the sprint. For example, the SM has a laissez-faire policy as far as access to the development team is concerned. Or the SM does not object that the management invites engineers to random meetings as subject matter experts. Or the scrum master allows that either stakeholders or managers turn the daily scrum into a reporting session. (6) The sixth episode covers the skipped Retrospective: All Scrum events are essential for a team’s success — you cannot skip an event. Junior Scrum teams may be tempted to skip Retrospectives to buy some more time to meet the sprint goal. (7) The seventh episode covers the static sprint goal: According to the Scrum guide, the Scope may be clarified and re-negotiated between the Product Owner and the development team as more is learned. There is no such thing as a static sprint goal. (8) The eighth episode covers the hardening sprint: The Scrum team decides to have a hardening or clean-up sprint. That is a simple one: there is no such thing as a hardening sprint in Scrum. (9) The ninth episode covers variable sprint lengths: The scrum team extends the sprint length by a few days to meet the sprint goal. This extension is just another way of cooking the agile books. Please remember: the sprint goal is delivering working software that delights the customers within the available time-box. Stop lying to yourself. (10) The tenth episode covers special Scrum forces: A manager assigns specific tasks directly to engineers, bypassing the Product Owner. Alternatively, the manager removes an engineer from the Scrum team to work on such a task. (11) The eleventh episode covers the everything-is-a-bug stakeholder hack: Stakeholders try to speed up delivery of their issues by relabeling tasks as ‘serious bugs.’ First of all — nice try! Nevertheless, the Scrum Master shall address the stakeholders in question and coach them on “useful interaction with the Scrum team.” (12) The twelveth episode covers the all-hands-to-the-pump moments: The management temporarily abandons Scrum in a critical situation. This is a classic manifestation of disbelief in agile practices, fed by command & control thinking. It is fine-weather sailing so to speak. Most likely, canceling the sprint and starting a new sprint addressing the issue at hand would also solve it. (SUMMARY) The last episode summarizes the dirty dozen of the sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. Don’t miss the next Hands-on Agile mini-series and subscribe to this Youtube channel. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-sprint-antipatterns-handson-agile-webinar-7
Views: 643 Age of Product
Scrum Product Backlog Anti-Patterns (Hands-on Agile Webinar #3)
 
50:10
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube There is no shortage of Scrum product backlog anti-patterns: From out-dated and oversized tickets to the part-time proxy product owner– answering to the product committee — and his or her repository of 623 ideas. Learn more about the numerous product backlog anti-patterns that can manifest themselves when you create value for your customers. Moreover, learn how to prevent them in the first place. HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-product-backlog/
Views: 1066 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (2) — Spillover Not Discussed (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers undiscussed spillovers: Unfinished user stories and other tasks from the last sprint spill over into the new sprint without any discussion. There might be good reasons for that, for example, a task’s value has not changed. It should not be an automatism, though, remember the sunk cost fallacy. HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 228 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (11) – Allocation of Capacity (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the misallocation of the development team’s resources: In addition to a lack of slack time, the development team is also not demanding adequate capacity to tackle technical debt and bugs during the sprint. (The rule of thumb is that 20 to 25 % of resources are allocated every sprint to fix bugs and refactor the code base. If the product owner ignores this practice, and the development team accepts this violation the scrum team will find itself in a downward spiral. Its future product delivery capability will decrease.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 165 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (12) – The Agile Workspace (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
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START AT THE BEGINNING:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The twelveth episode covers inadequate facilities. (A team is not co-located, not working in the same room, but scattered across different floors, or worse, various locations. The work environment is lacking spots for formal and – more important – informal communication: cafeterias, tea kitchens, sofas, etc. Or it requires whiteboards.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 57 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (13) – The Summary (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. The last episode summarizes the dirty dozen of sprint planning anti-patterns: They start with the lack of a sprint goal and do not end with a neglected or overly accurate sprint planning II. Don’t miss the next Hands-on Agile mini-series on Scrum anti-patterns and subscribe to this Youtube channel.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 165 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (5) – Efficiency Fetish (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
01:50
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START AT THE BEGINNING:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The fifth episode covers the efficiency and utilization focus. (The management still believes in its traditional role: telling people what to do, how to do things, and making sure everyone is busy at all times. Therefore, engineers are considered to be too valuable to waste their time with user interview.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 49 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (2) – The PBIs as Artefact (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
02:44
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers creating the product backlog in the wrong way: The product owner treats product backlog items not as a token for discussion to build a shared understanding of the why, how, and what with the team, but as deliverables. Often, the PO creates product backlog items upfront by copying from requirement documents without including other members of the scrum team. HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 148 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (1) – A Lack of Vision (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
01:17
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START AT THE BEGINNING: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The first episode covers the lack of a vision. (Why is the organization pursuing to become agile? The organization is not transparent about vision and strategy hence the teams are hindered to become self-organizing. Or let us put it in a different way, Alice-in-Wonderland style: “If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there.”) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 86 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (6) – Overcommitment by the Team (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
01:23
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the case of overcommitment by the scrum team: The scrum team regularly takes on way too many tasks and moves unfinished work directly to the next sprint. (If two or three items spill over to the next sprint, so be it. If regularly 30-40 percent of the original forecast is not delivered during the sprint the scrum team may have created a kind of ‘time-boxed Kanban.' Maybe, this is the right moment to ask the scrum team whether moving to Kanban might be an alternative.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 158 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
15:42
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile webinar addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns CONTENT: (1) The first anti-pattern covers the lack of a sprint goal: The product owner cannot provide a sprint goal, or the chosen sprint goal is flawed. (2) The second anti-pattern covers undiscussed spillovers: Unfinished user stories and other tasks from the last sprint spill over into the new sprint without any discussion. (There might be good reasons for that, for example, a task’s value has not changed. It should not be an automatism, though, remember the sunk cost fallacy.) (3) The third anti-pattern covers the pushy PO: The product owner pushes the development team to take on more tasks than it could realistically handle. Probably, the product owner is referring to former team metrics such as velocity to support his or her desire. (4) The fourth anti-pattern covers the introduction of a stage-gate like system by misusing the definition of ready: The definition of ready is handled dogmatically thus creating a stage-gate-like approval process. (5) The fifth anti-pattern covers the imposed forecast of the scrum team: The sprint forecast is not a team-based decision. Or it is not free from outside influence. (6) The sixth anti-pattern covers the case of overcommitment by the scrum team: The scrum team regularly takes on way too many tasks and moves unfinished work directly to the next sprint. (7) The seventh anti-pattern covers variable sprint lengths: The scrum team has variable sprint cadences. For example, tasks are not sized to fit into the regular sprint length. Instead, the sprint length is adapted to the size of the tasks. (8) The eighth anti-pattern covers the exclusion of some scrum team members from the sprint planning: The development team does not participate collectively in the sprint planning. Instead, two team members, for example, the tech and UX lead, represent the team. (9) The ninth anti-pattern covers the failure of the development team to check its capacity in advance: The team members do not determine their availability at the beginning of the sprint planning. (Good luck with making a forecast in this situation.) (10) The tenth anti-pattern covers missing slack time for the development team: The development team is not demanding 20% slack time from the product owner. (11) The eleventh anti-pattern covers the misallocation of the development team’s resources: In addition to a lack of slack time, the development team is also not demanding adequate capacity to tackle technical debt and bugs during the sprint. (12) The twelveth anti-pattern covers the sprint planning II: The development team is skipping the sprint planning II altogether.
Views: 169 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (0) — Introduction (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
01:44
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. The first episode covers the lack of a sprint goal. HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 696 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (7) – Variable Sprint Lengths (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
00:57
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers variable sprint lengths: The scrum team has variable sprint cadences. For example, tasks are not sized to fit into the regular sprint length. Instead, the sprint length is adapted to the size of the tasks. (It is quite common to extend the sprint length at the end of the year when most of the team members are on holiday. However, there is no reason to deviate from the regular cadence during the rest of the year. Instead of changing the sprint length, the scrum team should invest more effort into sizing epics and user stories in the right way.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 155 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (4) – Toying w/ Definition of Ready (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
01:27
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the introduction of a stage-gate-like system by misusing the definition of ready: The definition of ready is handled dogmatically thus creating a stage-gate-like approval process. (That is an interesting topic for a discussion among the team members. For example, should a valuable user story be postponed to another sprint just because the front end designs will not be available for another two working days? My suggestion: take it to the team. If they agree with the circumstances and accept the user story into the sprint — that is fine. HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 188 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (4) – Prioritization by Proxy (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
01:53
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers prioritization by proxy: A single stakeholder or a committee of stakeholder prioritizes the product backlog — not the product owner. (The strength of Scrum is building on the strong position of the product owner. The product owner is the only person to decide what tasks become product backlog items. Hence, the product owner also decides on the priority. Take away that empowerment, and Scrum turns into a pretty robust waterfall 2.0 process.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 121 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Anti-Patterns (2) – The Interfering Product Owner (Hands-on Agile Webinar #7)
 
01:32
NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfUxdqW0GOs This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. The second episode covers the interfering Product Owner: You can change the sprint backlog—if the development team agrees—as the sprint backlog is not static. However, the Product Owner cannot single-handedly change it, for example, increase its scope. (The sprint cancellation is the exception to this rule if you want to consider abandoning the current sprint as a change of its sprint backlog.) YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-sprint-antipatterns-handson-agile-webinar-7
Views: 34 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (9) – Misaligned Incentives (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
01:20
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START AT THE BEGINNING:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The ninth episode covers misaligned incentives. (The incentives of teams on the one side and stakeholders or individual team members on the other side are contradicting each other — which can easily result in a morale hazard. For example, the sales department tries to save the quarterly bonus by ‘requiring’ new features they hope will bring new revenue or sells non-existing products.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 47 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (0) – Introduction (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
02:27
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. Hence — in my mental model of agile product development — the product owner covers by far the most extensive ground of all roles. HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 593 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (9) – The Absent Product Owner (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
01:50
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers the absent product owner. If the PO is not available for immediate clarification, he or she will create artificial queues that probably will put the scrum team’s sprint goal at risk. For example, the product owner does not accept sprint backlog items once those are finished. Instead, he or she waits until the end of the sprint. (In the spirit of continuous integration, the product owner should immediately check tasks that meet the acceptance criteria. Otherwise, the product owner will create an artificial queue which will increase the cycle-time. This habit puts also reaching the sprint goal at risk.) (This anti-pattern creates a micro-waterfall approach for the duration of the sprint.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 102 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (6) – No Sprint Goal  (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
02:02
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers the lack of a sprint goal: The product owner cannot provide a sprint goal, or the chosen sprint goal is flawed. (An original sprint goal answers the “What are we fighting for?” question. It is a negotiation between the product owner and the development team. It is focused and measurable, as sprint goal and team forecast go hand in hand. Lastly, the sprint goal is a useful calibration for the upcoming sprint.) NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 120 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (10) – The Interfering Product Owner (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
01:58
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers the product owner who cannot let go product backlog items once they become sprint backlog items. For example, the product owner increases the scope of a user story. Or, he or she changes acceptance criteria once the team accepted the issue into the sprint backlog. (There is a clear line: before a product backlog item turns into a sprint backlog item the product owner is responsible. However, once it moves from one backlog to the other, the development team becomes responsible. If changes become acute during the sprint the team will collaboratively decide on how to handle them.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 91 Age of Product
Scrum Master Anti-Patterns (13) — The Summary (Hands-on Agile Webinar #8)
 
01:48
NEWSLETTER — join more than 20,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZUU9AIZVyQ This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar Scrum Master anti-patterns: from the agile manager to the team secretary to dogmatism. The last episode summarizes my dirty dozen of Scrum Master anti-patterns: from ill-suited personal traits and the pursuit of individual agendas to frustration with the team itself. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 20,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Scrum Master Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-scrum-master/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-master-antpatterns-handson-agile-webinar-8-123268149
Views: 29 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (8) – Taylorism & Micromanagement (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
01:49
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START AT THE BEGINNING:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The eighth episode covers prevailing Taylorism and the resulting micromanagement. (A perceived loss of control at the management level leads to micro-management. Or the organization is practicing ‘agile light:’ The management abandons self-organization the moment a critical problem appears and forms ‘task forces’ instead.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 61 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (8) – Last Minute Changes (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
01:22
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers how the product owner might be toying with the definition of ready. The PO tries to squeeze in some last-minute user stories that do not meet the definition of ready. (Principally, it is the prerogative of the product owner to make such kind of changes to ensure that the development team is working only on the most valuable user stories at any given time. However, if the scrum team is otherwise practicing product backlog refinement sessions regularly, these occurrences should be a rare exception. If those happen frequently, it indicates that the product owner needs help with prioritization and team communication. Or the product owner needs support to say ‘no’ more often to stakeholders.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 103 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Anti-Patterns (0) – Introduction (Hands-on Agile Webinar #7)
 
02:45
NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfUxdqW0GOs This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. Let us start with a short refresher from the Scrum Guide. The purpose of the sprint is to deliver a potentially releasable product increment. It is time-box of less than a month but more than one week. No changes are made to the sprint backlog that would endanger the Sprint Goal, but the scope may be clarified and re-negotiated between the PO and Development Team as more is learned. The quality goals do not decrease. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-sprint-antipatterns-handson-agile-webinar-7
Views: 49 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (13) – The Summary (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
01:35
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. The last episode summarizes the dirty dozen of the product owner anti-patterns: From an oversized product backlog to the lack of a sprint goal, to not letting go of items once the sprint starts. Don’t miss the next Hands-on Agile mini-series on scrum master anti-patterns and subscribe to this Youtube channel.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 153 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (5) – Imposed Forecast (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
00:57
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the imposed forecast of the scrum team: The sprint forecast is not a team-based decision. Or it is not free from outside influence. (There are several anti-patterns here. For example, an assertive product owner dominates the development team by defining its scope of the forecast. Or a stakeholder points at the team’s previous velocity demanding to take on more user stories. (“We need to fill our free capacity.”) Or the ‘tech lead’ of the development team is making a forecast on behalf of the team.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 167 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (6) – No Rapid Build, Test, Learn Culture (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
02:05
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START AT THE BEGINNING:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The sixth episode covers the convoy of silos, resulting in the organization moving at the speed of the slowest to change silo. (The organization is not optimized for a rapid build-test-learn culture, and thus departments are moving at different speed levels. The resulting friction caused is likely to equalize previous Agile gains.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 40 Age of Product
Scrum Master Anti-Patterns (1) — The Agile Manager (Hands-on Agile Webinar #8)
 
02:02
NEWSLETTER — join more than 20,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZUU9AIZVyQ This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar Scrum Master anti-patterns: from the agile manager to the team secretary to dogmatism. The first episode covers the agile manager. Self-organization does not mean the absence of management: why handle pay-role as a Scrum Team? Outsourcing of tasks to the management is hence common. However, Scrum is by all means not about exercising command & control; the Scrum master is not a supervisor. Typical signs of Taylorism are: providing working agreements to speed up the getting productive phase of a new or inexperienced team, turning the daily scrum into reporting session, pushing the team to take more on during sprint planning, assigning sub-tasks to developers, or defining technical solutions: The engineer turned SM and is now ‘suggesting’ how the scrum team implements tasks. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 20,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Scrum Master Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-scrum-master/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-master-antpatterns-handson-agile-webinar-8-123268149
Views: 23 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Anti-Patterns (8) – The Hardening Sprint (Hands-on Agile Webinar #7)
 
01:38
NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfUxdqW0GOs This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. The eighth episode covers the hardening sprint: The Scrum team decides to have a hardening or clean-up sprint. That is a simple one: there is no such thing as a hardening sprint in Scrum. Let’s revisit the Scrum Guide: Quality goals do not decrease. Hence hardening sprints are commonly a sign of a low grade of adoption of agile principles by the development team or the (engineering) organization. If you encounter this anti-pattern, ask yourself: Is the development team cross-functional? Or is QA still a functional, non-agile silo? Suggesting a hardening sprint thus violates a core component of Scrum: adherence to the Definition of Done. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-sprint-antipatterns-handson-agile-webinar-7
Views: 38 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (13) – The Summary (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
04:13
START AT THE BEGINNING:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The last episode summarizes twelve familiar failure patterns of agile transitions: from the organizational level to personal issues to technology, team, and facility issues. HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 75 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Anti-Patterns (11) – The Everything-Is-a-Bug Hack (Hands-on Agile Webinar #7)
 
02:00
NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfUxdqW0GOs This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. The eleventh episode covers the everything-is-a-bug stakeholder hack: Stakeholders try to speed up delivery of their issues by relabeling tasks as ‘serious bugs.’ First of all — nice try! Nevertheless, the Scrum Master shall address the stakeholders in question and coach them on “useful interaction with the Scrum team.” As Joko Willink likes to say: leadership is not what you preach, but what you let slip through. And while you’re at it: Watch also out for stakeholders trying to sneak in small tasks by pitching them directly to developers. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-sprint-antipatterns-handson-agile-webinar-7
Views: 31 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (10) – No Slack Time (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
01:00
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers missing slack time for the development team: The development team is not demanding 20% slack time from the product owner. (If a team’s capacity is always over-utilized, its performance will decrease over time. This will mainly happen in an organization with volatile daily business. As a consequence, everyone will focus on getting his or her tasks done. There will be less time to support teammates or to pair. The team will no longer address smaller or urgent issues promptly. Individual team members will become bottlenecks, which might seriously impede the flow within the team. Lastly, the ‘I am busy’ attitude will reduce the generation of a shared understanding among all team members. Overutilization will always push the individual team member to focus on his or her output. On the other side, slack time will allow the scrum team to act collaboratively and focus on the outcome.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 154 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (8) – Not a Team Event (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
00:53
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the exclusion of some scrum team members from the sprint planning: The development team does not participate collectively in the sprint planning. Instead, two team members, for example, the tech and UX lead, represent the team. (Regarding the idea of one or two ‘leading’ teammates in a scrum team, there are none. And unless you are using LeSS – no pun intended – where the scrum teams are represented in the overall sprint planning, the whole scrum team needs to participate. It is a team effort, and everyone’s voice hence needs to be heard.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 150 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Anti-Patterns (7) – The Static Sprint Goal (Hands-on Agile Webinar #7)
 
01:06
NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfUxdqW0GOs This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. The seventh episode covers the static sprint goal: According to the Scrum guide, the Scope may be clarified and re-negotiated between the Product Owner and the development team as more is learned. There is no such thing as a static sprint goal. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-sprint-antipatterns-handson-agile-webinar-7
Views: 22 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (5) – The Omniscient Product Owner (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
01:23
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers the omniscient product owner: The PO does not involve stakeholders or subject matter experts in the refinement process, and probably not even the Scrum team. (A product owner who believes to be either omniscient or a communication gateway is a risk to the Scrum team’s success.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 114 Age of Product
Building An Airport W/ LEGO® At An Agile Workshop
 
01:58
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube The video was taken during the product owner training course of Podojo in Berlin in autumn 2014. To learn how to deal sprints in Scrum, we were tasked to build an airport.
Views: 619 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (12) – Too much Sprint Planning II (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
00:58
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the sprint planning II: The development team is skipping the sprint planning II altogether. (Skipping the sprint planning II is unfortunate, as it is also an excellent situation to talk about how to spread knowledge within the development team. For example, the team should think about who will be pairing with whom on what task. The sprint planning II is also a well-suited to consider how to reduce technical debt. Alternatively, during sprint planning II, the development team plans every single subtask of the upcoming sprint. (Don’t become too granular. Two-thirds of the sub-tasks are more than sufficient, the rest will follow naturally during the sprint. Doing too much planning upfront might result in waste.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 133 Age of Product
Agile Failure Patterns 2.0 (2) – Is Agile a Fad or Trend? (Hands-on Agile Webinar #4)
 
02:20
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START AT THE BEGINNING:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzmfObQjCfc Agile failure seems to be increasingly more prominent nowadays despite all the efforts undertaken by numerous organization embarking on their journeys to become agile. The curious thing is: Who would disagree that the four core principles of the Agile Manifesto — individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, responding to change over following a plan — are derived from applying common sense to a challenging problem? Moreover, that the application of those principles might be suited to fix numerous organizational dysfunctions? This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar failure patterns of agile transitions organizations are suffering from: from the lack of a vision to the non-existent failure cultures to the ‘what is in for me’ syndrome. The second episode covers the question whether ‘agile’ is a fad or trend. (The middle management as well as team members do not embrace an agile mindset or abandon it quietly, believing it is a management fad that will go away sooner or later.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: https://age-of-product.com/webinar-agile-failure-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-4-agile-failure-patterns-20
Views: 62 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (1) – The Oversized Product Backlog (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
02:46
NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers the oversized product backlog: The product backlog contains more items than the scrum team can deliver within three to four sprints. This way the product owner creates waste by hoarding issues that might never materialize. The product owner is probably using the product backlog as a repository of ideas and requirements. (This practice is clogging the product backlog, may lead to a cognitive overload and makes alignment with the ‘big picture’ at portfolio management and roadmap planning level very tough.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 196 Age of Product
Scrum Product Owner Anti-Patterns (12) – The Unapproachable PO (Hands-on Agile Webinar #6)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdShrtbeVkY If you are working as a product owner, there is — very likely — room for improvement. I curated the most common product owner anti-patterns to help you up your game. If you like to improve on those anti-patterns that you recognize why don’t you ask the scrum master and the team for support? The product owner anti-patterns list is a good starting point for a mutually beneficial retrospective. According to the Scrum Guide, the product owner is sole and accountable person optimizing the work of the engineers. In other words, the product owner has ideas or identifies ideas, or at least he or she curates suitable ideas from wherever and validates them whether those ideas are “product backlog worthy” or not. In my experience, this approach turns the product owner into the Achilles heel — or bottleneck by design — of the whole process. If you "remove" the PO as an independent and respected role, for example, by sticking with your organizations' stage-gate process, Scrum easily mutates into a Waterfall 2.0 process. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar product owner anti-patterns interfering with the concept of the Scrum product owner role. Learn how to improve your professional performance by avoiding the typical product owner mistakes: from oversized product backlogs and prioritization by proxy, to be absent during the sprint, and outing yourself as a loner during the sprint review. This episode covers the unapproachable, the broadcasting product owner. The PO is not accepting feedback from the customers and the stakeholders. (Such behavior violates the prime purpose of the sprint review ceremony: getting feedback from customers, users, and stakeholders, answering the most critical question of the ceremony: Are we still on the right track, are we even creating value?) HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER: Learn about new webinars in advance: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/product-owner-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/handson-agile-webinar-6-product-owner-antipatterns
Views: 84 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (9) – No Capacity Check (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the failure of the development team to check its capacity in advance: The team members do not determine their availability at the beginning of the sprint planning. (Good luck with making a forecast in this situation.) HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 142 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns (3) – The Pushy Product Owner (Hands-on Agile Webinar #5)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join 18,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube START FROM EPISODE #1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJliMvqU2TU&list=PLEUCSYe8YDkItuTivvgi3SBB2X_5iGC13 There is no shortage of Scrum anti-patterns, impeding your team’s ability to deliver value to your customers. This Hands-on Agile mini-series covers Scrum’s sprint planning ceremony. The purpose of the sprint planning is to align the development team and the product owner. Both need to agree on the shippable product increment of the next sprint. The idea is that the development team’s forecast reflects the product owner’s sprint goal. Also, the team needs to come up with a plan on how to accomplish its commitment. Easier said than done, it appears. This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 common sprint planning anti-patterns. Learn how to keep a simple scrum ceremony useful by avoiding typical mistakes, from pushy POs, toying with the definition of ready to obstructing the future flow by pushing utilization to 110%. This episode covers the pushy PO: The product owner pushes the development team to take on more tasks than it could realistically handle. Probably, the product owner is referring to former team metrics such as velocity to support his or her desire. HOST: Stefan Wolpers BLOG: “Scrum: 19 Sprint Planning Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-planning-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/webinar-5-sprint-planning-antipatterns
Views: 213 Age of Product
Scrum Sprint Anti-Patterns (10) – Special Scrum Forces (Hands-on Agile Webinar #7)
 
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NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube WATCH ALL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfUxdqW0GOs This Hands-on Agile mini-series addresses 12 familiar sprint anti-patterns: from gold-plating, delivery Y instead of X, to absenteeism, side-gigs, and organizing people instead of the flow of work. The tenth episode covers special Scrum forces: A manager assigns specific tasks directly to engineers, bypassing the Product Owner. Alternatively, the manager removes an engineer from the Scrum team to work on such a task. This behavior does not only violate core Scrum principles. It also indicates that the manager cannot let go command and control practices. He or she continues to micromanage subordinates although the Scrum team could accomplish the task in a self-organized manner. This behavior demonstrates a level of ignorance that may require support from a higher management level to deal with. YOUR HOST: Stefan Wolpers NEWSLETTER — join more than 19,000 peers: https://age-of-product.com/subscribe/?ref=youtube BLOG: “Product Owner Anti-Patterns”: https://age-of-product.com/scrum-sprint-anti-patterns/ SLIDEDECK: https://www.slideshare.net/wolpers1/scrum-sprint-antipatterns-handson-agile-webinar-7
Views: 27 Age of Product

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