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The Magic Flute - Queen of the Night aria (Mozart; Diana Damrau, The Royal Opera)
 
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Soprano Diana Damrau sings 'Der Hölle Rache', the famous Queen of the Night aria from Mozart's The Magic Flute, with Dorothea Röschmann as Pamina. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/flute Mozart wrote Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute) for a suburban theatre in Vienna, the Theater auf der Wieden. He drew on the magical spectacle and earthy comedy of popular Viennese theatre. As well as being a comedy, The Magic Flute is an expression of Mozart’s profound spiritual beliefs: Enlightenment concerns with the search for wisdom and virtue are at the heart of this enchanting tale. The Magic Flute was an instant success with audiences and Mozart’s supposed rival Salieri described it as an ‘operone’ – a great opera. David McVicar’s classic production embraces both the seriousness and comedy of Mozart’s work. The audience is transported to a fantastical world of dancing animals, flying machines and dazzlingly starry skies. The setting provides a wonderful backdrop for Mozart’s kaleidoscopic score, from the Queen of the Night’s coloratura fireworks to Tamino and Pamina’s lyrical love duets and Papageno’s hearty, folksong-like arias.
Views: 6259163 Royal Opera House
Carmen - Habanera (Bizet; Anna Caterina Antonacci, The Royal Opera)
 
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Spanish heat and gypsy passion are brought to the stage in Francesca Zambello's vivid production of Bizet's opera: http://www.roh.org.uk/carmen The Habanera is the aria Carmen sings when she first appears on stage. It is also known as 'L'amour est un oiseau rebelle'. Carmen was based on a popular novella of the same name by Prosper Mérimée, which enticed French readers with exotic tales of Spain. Its heady combination of passion, sensuality and violence initially proved too much for the stage and Georges Bizet's opera was a critical failure on its premiere in 1875. Bizet died shortly after, never learning of the spectacular success Carmen would achieve -- it has been staged over 500 times at Covent Garden alone. Carmen contains many well-loved numbers, such as Carmen's seductive Habanera and Escamillo's rousing Toreador's song, in which he celebrates the thrill of the bullfight. Richly coloured designs capture the sultry heat of the Spanish sun, while ranks of soldiers, crowds of peasants, gypsies and bullfighters bring 19th-century Seville alive. This combination of memorable music, vivid setting and dramatic story have made Carmen one of the most popular operas in the world.
Views: 11645895 Royal Opera House
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - The Caterpillar (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Sarah Lamb as Alice and Eric Underwood, Christina Arestis, Olivia Cowley, Melissa Hamilton and Nathalie Harrison as the Caterpillar in Christopher Wheeldon's ballet Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Recorded for cinema broadcast on 28 March 2013. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/alice Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland arrived on the stage in 2011 with a burst of colour, theatrical magic and inventive choreography. It was The Royal Ballet’s first new full-length work since 1995 and was greeted with delight by audiences. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative sets and costumes draw on puppetry, projections and masks to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary characters, from the highly-strung Queen of Hearts, who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty's famous Rose Adage, to dancing playing cards, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. Alice and the Knave of Hearts dance a tender, loving pas de deux of delicate beauty. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story – a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all created in vivid detail.al Ballet as the Caterpillar in Christopher Wheeldon's ballet Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, cinema broadcast on 28 March 2013. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/alice Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland arrived on the stage in 2011 with a burst of colour, theatrical magic and inventive choreography. It was The Royal Ballet’s first new full-length work since 1995 and was greeted with delight by audiences. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative sets and costumes draw on puppetry, projections and masks to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary characters, from the highly-strung Queen of Hearts, who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty's famous Rose Adage, to dancing playing cards, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. Alice and the Knave of Hearts dance a tender, loving pas de deux of delicate beauty. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story – a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all created in vivid detail.
Views: 1406229 Royal Opera House
How Royal Ballet dancers prepare their pointe shoes
 
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Each Season The Royal Ballet dances through thousands of shoes at a cost of over £250,000. A gift of £39 to our annual Pointe Shoes Appeal could buy one pair of pointe shoes for a Royal Ballet dancer. For more information on the Pointe Shoes Appeal or to make a gift, please visit www.roh.org.uk/pointe. Thank you so much for your consideration and support. Text costs £5 plus network charge. Royal Opera House Covent Garden Foundation receives 100% of your donation. Full T&Cs at www.roh.org.uk/pointe
Views: 2996563 Royal Opera House
The Sleeping Beauty - White Cat and Puss-in-Boots pas de deux (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Elizabeth Harrod as the White Cat and Paul Kay as Puss-in-Boots dance in Act III of The Sleeping Beauty, The Royal Ballet 2011/12 Season. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/sleepingbeauty The Sleeping Beauty holds a special place in The Royal Ballet's repertory. It was the ballet with which the Company reopened the Royal Opera House in 1946 after World War II, announcing its move from Sadler's Wells to Covent Garden. Margot Fonteyn danced the role of the beautiful princess Aurora in the first performance, with Robert Helpmann as Prince Florimund. Sixty years later, in 2006, the original 1946 staging was revived, returning Oliver Messel's wonderful designs and glittering costumes to the stage once again. Marius Petipa's classic 19th-century choreography is combined with newly created sections by Frederick Ashton, Anthony Dowell and Christopher Wheeldon. The ballet contains many memorable moments, from the iconic Rose Adagio, when Aurora meets her four royal suitors, to the vigorous hunting dances and the famous waltz for Aurora and her Prince. Throughout, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's score conveys passion and intensity.
Views: 543079 Royal Opera House
Swan Lake - Coda from the Black Swan pas de deux in Act III (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Marianela Nuñez as Odile and Vadim Muntagirov as Prince Siegfried in the Act III Black Swan Pas de deux of Liam Scarlett's production of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov’s Swan Lake. Swan Lake was Tchaikovsky’s first score for ballet. Given its status today as arguably the best loved and most admired of all classical ballets, it is perhaps surprising that at its premiere in 1877 Swan Lake was poorly received. It is thanks to the 1895 production by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov that Swan Lake has become part of not only ballet consciousness but also wider popular culture. That success is secured not only by the sublime, symphonic sweep of Tchaikovsky’s score, but also by the striking choreographic contrasts between Petipa’s royal palace scenes and the lyric lakeside scenes created by Ivanov. Swan Lake has had a special role in the repertory of The Royal Ballet since 1934. Since then there has been a succession of productions, the most recent of which was overseen by Anthony Dowell. This Season the Company creates a new production with additional choreography by Artist in Residence Liam Scarlett. Scarlett, while remaining faithful to the Petipa-Ivanov text, will bring fresh eyes to the staging of this classic ballet, in collaboration with his long-term designer John Macfarlane. Find out more at roh.org.uk/swanlake
Views: 372675 Royal Opera House
The Sleeping Beauty - Bluebird and Princess Florine pas de deux (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Yuhui Choe and Alexander Campbell dance Princess Florine and the Bluebird in Act III of The Sleeping Beauty, The Royal Ballet 2011/12. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/sleepingbeauty The Sleeping Beauty holds a special place in The Royal Ballet's repertory. It was the ballet with which the Company reopened the Royal Opera House in 1946 after World War II, announcing its move from Sadler's Wells to Covent Garden. Margot Fonteyn danced the role of the beautiful princess Aurora in the first performance, with Robert Helpmann as Prince Florimund. Sixty years later, in 2006, the original 1946 staging was revived, returning Oliver Messel's wonderful designs and glittering costumes to the stage once again. Marius Petipa's classic 19th-century choreography is combined with newly created sections by Frederick Ashton, Anthony Dowell and Christopher Wheeldon. The ballet contains many memorable moments, from the iconic Rose Adagio, when Aurora meets her four royal suitors, to the vigorous hunting dances and the famous waltz for Aurora and her Prince. Throughout, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's score conveys passion and intensity.
Views: 1246897 Royal Opera House
Becoming the Queen of Hearts - The Royal Ballet's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
 
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The Alice's Adventures in Wonderland cast and creative team give an insight into creating the much-loved character of the Queen of Hearts. Royal Ballet Principals Zenaida Yanowsky, Sarah Lamb and Lauren Cuthbertson, Ballet Master Christopher Saunders and choreographer Christopher Wheeldon give a glimpse into the rehearsal studio into the creation of a modern classic. Christopher Wheeldon's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland arrived on the stage in 2011 with a burst of colour, theatrical magic and inventive choreography. It was The Royal Ballet's first full-length work since 1995 and was instantly acclaimed as a classic. Joby Talbot's score combines sweeping melodies, which gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century, with contemporary effects. Bob Crowley's wildly imaginative sets and costumes draw on puppetry, projections and masks to bring Wonderland to life. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary characters down the rabbit hole: from the highly-strung Queen of Hearts, who performs a hilarious rendition of the famous Rose Adagio from The Sleeping Beauty; to dancing playing cards; a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. There is a love narrative for Alice and the Knave of Hearts, and they dance a tender pas de deux at the close of Act II. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll's story -- a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and an unhinged tea party are all created in vivid detail. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/alices-adventures-in-wonderland-by-christopher-wheeldon
Views: 1214494 Royal Opera House
The Tart Adage from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (The Royal Ballet, 2017)
 
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Principal dancer Laura Morera dances the Tart Adage from Christopher Wheeldon's production of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (The Royal Ballet, 2017). Pre-order on DVD/Blu-Ray: 📀 http://bit.ly/ROHalicedvd Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland burst onto the stage in 2011 in an explosion of colour, stage magic and inventive, sophisticated choreography. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative, eye-popping designs draw on everything from puppetry to projections to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary and instantly recognizable characters, from the highly strung Queen of Hearts – who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty’s famous Rose Adage – to a playing card corps de ballet, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story: a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all here in vivid detail. The delicious result shows The Royal Ballet at its best, bringing together world-class dance with enchanting family entertainment.
Views: 382800 Royal Opera House
La fille mal gardée - The Clog Dance from Act I (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Will Tuckett as Widow Simone and Marianela Nuñez as Lise with Cindy Jourdain, Sarah Lamb, Laura Morera and Deirdre Chapman and artists of The Royal Ballet in the Clog Dance from Act I of Frederick Ashton's La fille mal gardée. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/la-fille-mal-gardee-by-frederick-ashton Frederick Ashton's final full-length ballet is one of his most joyous creations, inspired by his love for the Suffolk countryside. It is based on an 1828 French ballet and the music was adapted by John Lanchbery from Ferdinand Hérold's original score. La Fille mal gardée was a resounding success on its premiere in 1960 and has remained a firm favourite in The Royal Ballet's repertory. The title translates as 'The Wayward Daughter'. La Fille displays some of Ashton's most virtuoso choreography – the youthful passion of Lise and her lover, Colas, is expressed in a series of energetic pas de deux. The ballet is laced with good humour and a whirl of dancing chickens, grouchy guardians and a halfwit suitor take to the stage. Ashton affectionately incorporated elements of national folk dance into his choreography, from a Lancashire clog dance to a maypole dance, making La Fille mal gardée (despite its title) The Royal Ballet's most emphatically English work. Osbert Lancaster's colourful designs reinforce the bucolic wit of the production.
Views: 558636 Royal Opera House
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland – Mad Hatter's Tea Party (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Alice (Lauren Cuthbertson) stumbles upon the Mad Hatter (Steven McRae) in Christopher Wheeldon's curious production of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland for The Royal Ballet. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/alice Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland burst onto the stage in 2011 in an explosion of colour, stage magic and inventive, sophisticated choreography. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative, eye-popping designs draw on everything from puppetry to projections to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary and instantly recognizable characters, from the highly strung Queen of Hearts – who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty’s famous Rose Adage – to a playing card corps de ballet, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story: a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all here in vivid detail. The delicious result shows The Royal Ballet at its best, bringing together world-class dance with enchanting family entertainment.
Views: 510679 Royal Opera House
Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy from The Nutcracker (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Lauren Cuthbertson performs the famous Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, set to Tchaikovsky's iconic score. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/nutcracker Peter Wright’s nigh-on definitive production for The Royal Ballet ranks as one of the most enduring and enchanting versions of The Nutcracker. With its festive period setting, dancing snowflakes and enchanting stage magic, Lev Ivanov’s 1892 ballet has become the perfect Christmas entertainment, with Tchaikovsky’s sumptuous, sugar-spun music the most recognizable of all ballet scores. Loosely based on the story by E.T.A. Hoffmann, the ballet opens with the lively Christmas party that is hosted by the Stahlbaum family, its Victorian setting captured in opulent detail by Julia Trevelyan Oman’s designs. Wright’s choreography ingeniously incorporates surviving fragments of the ballet’s original material, including the sublime pas de deux for the Sugar Plum Fairy and her Prince. But in emphasizing the relationship between Clara and the Nutcracker Prince, the production also gains a touching subtext of first love.
Views: 8365061 Royal Opera House
Marguerite and Armand - Pas de deux (Sergei Polunin and Tamara Rojo, The Royal Ballet)
 
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Sergei Polunin and Tamara Rojo perform Frederick Ashton's Marguerite and Armand with The Royal Ballet, 2013. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/marguerite-and-armand-by-frederick-ashton Frederick Ashton created Marguerite and Armand for Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn in 1963 as a vehicle for their unique dance partnership. The narrative was drawn from the play La Dame aux camélias by Alexandre Dumas fils, which also inspired Giuseppe Verdi’s La traviata. Ashton concentrates the play’s tragic essence in choreography of great intensity – Fonteyn recalled that rehearsals for the work contained ‘a passion more real than life itself’. The ballet is set to Franz Liszt’s romantic Piano Sonata in B Minor and depicts the burgeoning love between Marguerite and Armand, which is movingly expressed through passionate lifts and increasingly free movements. However, the lovers’ happiness is threatened by social convention and the ‘gilded cage’ in which Marguerite lives – evoked by Cecil Beaton in his elegant stage designs. The moment at which Marguerite realizes that she must renounce Armand is one of devastating stillness. The final pas de deux, as Marguerite lies dying in Armand’s arms, is one of the most moving in all of ballet.
Views: 393846 Royal Opera House
Marianela Nuñez performs the Mad Scene in Giselle (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Royal Ballet Principal Marianela Nuñez performs the Mad Scene in Peter Wright's production of Giselle. Find out more about this scene http://www.roh.org.uk/news/dance-highlight-giselles-mad-scene A Giselle Digital Guide is available to purchase from the ROH website, containing specially selected films, articles and exclusives to bring you closer to the production: http://www.roh.org.uk/publications/royal-opera-house-guide-to-giselle. Giselle is the quintessential Romantic ballet. It transformed the dance world when it was first performed in Paris in 1841 and remains at the centre of the classical repertory. The role of Giselle provides a dancer with many technical and dramatic challenges, from the character's early love to her poignant descent into madness and final gesture of forgiveness from beyond the grave. With its combination of memorable story and exquisite choreography, Giselle is the perfect way to discover classical ballet.
Views: 232005 Royal Opera House
Don Quixote - Act I finale (Marianela Nuñez and Carlos Acosta, The Royal Ballet)
 
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Carlos Acosta as Basilio, Marianela Nuñez as Kitri, Yuhui Choe and Beatriz Stix-Brunell as Kitri's friends, Luca Acri, Paul Kay, Kenta Kura and Michael Stojko as the Rascals, Philip Mosley as Sancho Panza, Gary Avis as Lorenzo and Bennet Gartside as Gamache in Carlos Acosta's production of Marius Petipa's Don Quixote, with music by Ludwig Minkus. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/donquixote Carlos Acosta, Principal Guest Artist of The Royal Ballet, created his first work for the Company in 2013. He chose one of his favourite ballets – Marius Petipa's Don Quixote, a joyful adaptation of Miguel de Cervantes's classic novel. Acosta's production has proved itself a firm audience favourite, acclaimed for its breathtakingly virtuoso dancing, eye-popping designs by Tim Hatley and the sheer energy and exuberance of the production as a whole. The adventures of the bumbling knight Don Quixote and his ever-faithful squire Sancho Panza have been the inspiration for countless ballets, of which Petipa's is one of the best loved. Acosta has danced the virtuoso role of Basilio many times, and brings that experience to his unique and vibrant vision of the story. Ludwig Minkus's score, created for Petipa, is full of Spanish flair and atmosphere. Don Quixote, with its famously bravura Act III pas de deux and infectious ebullience, is wonderfully entertaining.
Views: 2448839 Royal Opera House
Swan Lake - Odile/Black Swan solo (Natalia Osipova, The Royal Ballet)
 
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Royal Ballet Principal dancer Natalia Osipova performs a solo as Odile, the Black Swan, in Anthony Dowell's opulent production of Swan Lake. Find out more at https://www.roh.org.uk/productions/swan-lake-by-anthony-dowell Swan Lake was Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky's first score for ballet. Its 1877 premiere was poorly received, but it has since become one of the most loved of all ballets. The twinned role of the radiant White Swan and the scheming, duplicitous Black Swan tests the full range of a ballerina's powers, particularly in the two great pas de deux of Acts II and III. Other highlights include the charming Dance of the Little Swans performed by a moonlit lake and sweeping ballroom waltzes in the splendour of the royal palace. Anthony Dowell's glorious interpretation uses classical choreography created by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa for the ballet's revised 1895 version. Dramatic costumes emphasize the contrast between human and spirit worlds, while glowing lanterns, shimmering fabrics and designs inspired by the work of Peter Carl Fabergé create a magical setting.
Views: 226218 Royal Opera House
Manon – Act I, 'Bedroom' pas de deux (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Marianela Nuñez as Manon and Federico Bonelli as Des Grieux Kenneth MacMillan’s masterpiece of modern ballet is revived this Season as part of continuing celebrations of MacMillan’s profound impact on British ballet, to mark the 25th anniversary of his death. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk Kenneth MacMillan’s source for Manon was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score drawn from across Massenet’s music, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, with the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet’s repertory, and a touchstone of adult, dramatic dance. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon and her struggle to escape poverty. Designs by his regular collaborator Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable destitution. MacMillan’s spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux’s impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan’s earlier Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan’s most powerful dramas.
Views: 207916 Royal Opera House
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Knave of Hearts Pas de deux (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Sarah Lamb as Alice and Federico Bonelli as Jack/Knave of Hearts in The Royal Ballet's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/alice Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland arrived on the stage in 2011 with a burst of colour, theatrical magic and inventive choreography. It was The Royal Ballet’s first new full-length work since 1995 and was greeted with delight by audiences. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative sets and costumes draw on puppetry, projections and masks to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary characters, from the highly-strung Queen of Hearts, who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty's famous Rose Adage, to dancing playing cards, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. Alice and the Knave of Hearts dance a tender, loving pas de deux of delicate beauty. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story – a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all created in vivid detail.
Views: 904171 Royal Opera House
Don Quixote – Act III Kitri Variation (Akane Takada, The Royal Ballet)
 
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Love and friendship triumph in Carlos Acosta's vibrant production of this dazzling ballet. Akane Takada of The Royal Ballet performs the Act III Variation as part of the recent live cinema screening. Find out more https://www.roh.org.uk/productions/don-quixote-by-carlos-acosta Don Quixote is one of Marius Petipa's much-loved 19th-century classics - its story is drawn from Miguel de Cervantes's classic novel and set to Ludwig Minkus's score. The ballet has long been acclaimed for its virtuoso dancing, beautiful and technically demanding 'vision scene' and the famously bravura and breath-taking Act III pas de deux. Carlos Acosta's production was created for The Royal Ballet in 2013, and brings the sunshine of Spain and the exuberance of the entire Company to the stage. Acosta created new choreography for the gypsy scene in Act II, and uniquely for this production of Don Quixote added on-stage musicians. Warmth, charm and entertainment abound in this energetic and witty ballet, reflected too in the characterful backdrops of Tim Hatley's vibrant designs.
Views: 192454 Royal Opera House
Swan Lake – Dance of the cygnets (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Meaghan Grace Hinkis, Isabella Gasparini, Romany Pajdak and Elizabeth Harrod dance as cygnets in Liam Scarlett's production of Swan Lake which will be broadcast on Christmas Day 2018 on BBC Four. Find out more at https://www.roh.org.uk/news/the-royal-ballets-swan-lake-to-be-broadcast-on-bbc-four-on-christmas-day-2018 Swan Lake was Tchaikovsky’s first score for ballet. Given its status today as arguably the best loved and most admired of all classical ballets, it is perhaps surprising that at its premiere in 1877 Swan Lake was poorly received. It is thanks to the 1895 production by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov that Swan Lake has become part of not only ballet consciousness but also wider popular culture. That success is secured not only by the sublime, symphonic sweep of Tchaikovsky’s score, but also by the striking choreographic contrasts between Petipa’s royal palace scenes and the lyric lakeside scenes created by Ivanov. Swan Lake has had a special role in the repertory of The Royal Ballet since 1934. Since then there has been a succession of productions, the most recent of which was a new production with additional choreography by Artist in Residence Liam Scarlett. Scarlett, while remaining faithful to the Petipa-Ivanov text, brought fresh eyes to the staging of this classic ballet, in collaboration with his long-term designer John Macfarlane.
Views: 86551 Royal Opera House
Tosca - Te Deum (Bryn Terfel, The Royal Opera)
 
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Bryn Terfel as Scarpia performing 'Te Deum' from Act I of Jonathan Kent's production of Tosca (2011). The Royal Opera. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/tosca-by-jonathan-kent Find out more: http://www.roh.org.uk/about/bp-big-screens From its famous, dissonant opening chords, Tosca conjures up a world of political instability and menace. The Chief of Police, Scarpia – one of the most malevolent villains in opera – ruthlessly pursues and tortures enemies of the state. His dark, demonic music contrasts with the expansive melodies of the idealistic lovers, Tosca and Cavaradossi, who express their passion in sublime arias. Giacomo Puccini’s dramatic work was an instant hit with audiences on its 1900 premiere and it remains one of the most performed of all operas. A candle-lit church, the darkness of a brooding study with its hidden torture chamber and the false optimism of a Roman dawn: Jonathan Kent’s naturalistic production throws into relief the ruthlessly taut drama, as the tension is wound up towards its fateful conclusion. Puccini’s score is infused with the same authentic detail, from distant canon fire during the Act I ‘Te Deum’ to tolling church bells and the sounds of a firing squad.
Views: 272972 Royal Opera House
Becoming The Mad Hatter: Steven McRae on Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (The Royal Ballet)
 
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The Royal Ballet's Steven McRae shows Darcey Bussell on how he created the character of the Mad Hatter with choreographer Christopher Wheeldon. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/alice Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland burst onto the stage in 2011 in an explosion of colour, stage magic and inventive, sophisticated choreography. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative, eye-popping designs draw on everything from puppetry to projections to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary and instantly recognizable characters, from the highly strung Queen of Hearts – who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty’s famous Rose Adage – to a playing card corps de ballet, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story: a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all here in vivid detail. The delicious result shows The Royal Ballet at its best, bringing together world-class dance with enchanting family entertainment.
Views: 199901 Royal Opera House
The corps de ballet rehearse Giselle (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Follow Ballet Mistress Samantha Raine, Artist Annette Buvoli and First Artist Nathalie Harrisonin in rehearsal for Act 2 of Peter Wright's production of Giselle. They discuss the technical and emotional challenges of the dance of the Wilis. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/giselle A Giselle Digital Guide is available to purchase from the ROH website, containing specially selected films, articles and exclusives to bring you closer to the production: http://www.roh.org.uk/publications/royal-opera-house-guide-to-giselle. Giselle is the quintessential Romantic ballet. It transformed the dance world when it was first performed in Paris in 1841 and remains at the centre of the classical repertory. Peter Wright's production for The Royal Ballet, which had its premiere in 1985, has had more than 550 performances. With its combination of memorable story and exquisite choreography, Giselle is the perfect way to discover classical ballet.
Views: 497565 Royal Opera House
Inside The Royal Ballet Healthcare Suite
 
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State-of-the-art facilities and techniques used by Premier League footballers ensure that Royal Ballet dancers have long and successful careers. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk In 2013 The Royal Ballet's Mason Healthcare Suite was opened, providing healthcare facilities for over 100 dancers in the Company. Named after former Director of The Royal Ballet Monica Mason, the facility helps dancers avoid and recover from injury. The team of healthcare professionals dedicated to supporting the dancers' fitness and wellbeing through therapies including massage, physiotherapy, Pilates and Gyrotonic training. Ensuring that every dancer achieves a long and full career is at the core of The Royal Ballet Healthcare team's work and is essential for the continued success of the Company.
Views: 159361 Royal Opera House
Mayerling – Bedroom pas de deux (Sarah Lamb, Steven McRae; The Royal Ballet)
 
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Sarah Lamb as Baroness Mary Vetsera and Steven McRae as Crown Prince Rudolf. Kenneth MacMillan’s Mayerling was filmed and screened live in cinemas on 15 October 2018. Find out more at https://www.roh.org.uk/productions/mayerling-by-kenneth-macmillan Mayerling is based on the true story of the deaths of Crown Prince Rudolf and his teenage mistress Mary Vetsera in 1889. This dark and intense ballet was created for The Royal Ballet in 1978 and is regarded by many as among Kenneth MacMillan's finest works. Orchestrated and arranged by John Lanchbery, the music of Franz Liszt sweeps the story to its intense conclusion, and sumptuous designs by Nicholas Georgiadis bring to life the formal, oppressive world of the Austro-Hungarian court. The large-scale crowd and court scenes show the whole Company off at its dramatic finest. But it is MacMillan's choreography for Rudolf, one of the most technically and emotionally demanding roles in the repertory for male dancers, that makes this ballet so iconic. Rudolf's emotional decline is charted through daring and visceral pas de deux with his mother, his wife and Mary Vetsera - choreography that pushes classical ballet to its limits.
Views: 83589 Royal Opera House
Wayne McGregor's Chroma – The Hardest Button to Button (The Royal Ballet)
 
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An extract from Wayne McGregor's Chroma, featuring Laura Morera and Eric Underwood dancing to The Hardest Button to Button by The White Stripes. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/chroma Wayne McGregor's Chroma explores the drama of the human body and its ability to communicate extremes of thought and emotion. The score, drawn from original music by Joby Talbot and his arrangements of music by American rock band The White Stripes, is combined with stark, minimalist designs by architect John Pawson. Against this backdrop is set the inventive and energy-driven choreography of McGregor. Chroma had its premiere in 2006 at the Royal Opera House and in 2007 received an Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production.
Views: 1549613 Royal Opera House
Giselle - Act II pas de deux (Natalia Osipova and Carlos Acosta, The Royal Ballet)
 
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Natalia Osipova as Giselle and Carlos Acosta as Albrecht in Act II of Peter Wright's production of Marius Petipa’s Giselle. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/giselle Giselle is the quintessential Romantic ballet. It transformed the dance world when it was first performed in Paris in 1841 and remains at the centre of the classical repertory. Although the choreography and designs have undergone many changes over the years, the essence of Giselle remains the same. The Royal Ballet’s production uses Marius Petipa’s classic version (after the original choreography by Jules Perrot and Jean Coralli), first staged in St Petersburg in 1884. The role of Giselle provides a dancer with many technical and dramatic challenges, from the character’s early love to her poignant descent into madness and final gesture of forgiveness from beyond the grave. The first act of the ballet is filled with historical detail and rustic colour. By contrast, the second act (known as the White Act) plunges the audience into an eerie moonlit forest haunted by the ethereal Wilis – vengeful spirits of young brides who died before their wedding day. With its combination of memorable story and exquisite choreography, Giselle is the perfect way to discover classical ballet.
Views: 1000761 Royal Opera House
'O mio babbino caro' from Gianni Schicchi (Ekaterina Siurina, The Royal Opera)
 
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Ekaterina Siurina as Lauretta sings this much-loved aria from Gianni Schicchi, the third of Puccini's trio of operas, Il trittico. Recorded at the Royal Opera House in 2011. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/gianni-schicchi-by-richard-jones Giacomo Puccini created Gianni Schicchi – the final work in his contrasting triple bill of operas, Il trittico – from a ‘desire to laugh and make others laugh’. It is his last comedy and its robust humour recalls some of the great Italian comic operas of the 19th century, such as Giuseppe Verdi’s Falstaff. Puccini based the opera on a passage from Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy, and engaged writer Giovacchino Forzano to create the libretto. Richard Jones’s production places the action in Italy in the mid-20th century and John Macfarlane’s designs provide a lively backdrop for the twists and turns of the plot. The score displays a kaleidoscope of different musical styles, including Lauretta’s famous aria, ‘O mio babbino caro’, in which she begs her father to intervene to help her marry her sweetheart Rinuccio, and the grand comic ensemble in which Schicchi impersonates the dying Buoso and remakes his will.
Views: 68214 Royal Opera House
The Nutcracker: Tricks and illusions (The Royal Ballet)
 
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A look at some of the special effects secrets from Peter Wright's magical production of The Nutcracker. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/nutcracker Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker score was commissioned by the director of the Russian Imperial Theatres, following the resounding success of Sleeping Beauty in 1890. Marius Petipa created the scenario – based on a fairytale by E. T. A. Hoffman – and Lev Ivanov provided the choreography. The Nutcracker was first performed in 1892 at the Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg. It initially had a poor reception, but its combination of enchanting choreography and an unforgettable score have since made it one of the best-loved of all ballets. In Peter Wright's classic production, the stage sparkles with theatrical magic – a Christmas tree grows before our eyes, toy soldiers come to life to fight the villainous Mouse King and Clara is whisked to the Land of Sweets on a golden sleigh. Tchaikovsky's score contains some of the best-known melodies in ballet, from the flurrying sounds of the Waltz of the Snowflakes to the dream-like Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and the vigorous Russian Dance. Julia Trevelyan Oman's designs draw upon 19th-century images of Christmas, making this a classic production for the festive season.
Views: 573178 Royal Opera House
Discover Ballet: A day in the life of a ballerina
 
07:56
Discover more: http://www.roh.org.uk Follow the day in the life of Yuhui Choe, first soloist, who takes us through her day - which includes, class, rehearsals and physio before going on stage that evening.
Views: 3693170 Royal Opera House
How Ballet Pointe Shoes are Made
 
03:21
Royal Ballet dancers Nathalie Harrison and Leanne Cope visit the Freed pointe shoe factory where they meet the shoe-makers who build their ballet shoes from scratch specifically made for each dancer to fit with their technique and foot shape. https://www.roh.org.uk/pointeshoesappeal https://www.facebook.com/royaloperahouse https://www.twitter.com/royaloperahouse
Views: 1381765 Royal Opera House
Swan Lake – Entrée and Adage from the Black Swan pas de deux (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Zenaida Yanowsky as Odile and Nehemiah Kish as Prince Siegfried in the Act III Black Swan Pas de deux of Anthony Dowell's production of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov’s Swan Lake. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/swan-lake-by-anthony-dowell Swan Lake was Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky's first score for ballet. Its 1877 premiere was poorly received, but it has since become one of the most loved of all ballets. The twinned role of the radiant White Swan and the scheming, duplicitous Black Swan tests the full range of a ballerina's powers, particularly in the two great pas de deux of Acts II and III. Other highlights include the charming Dance of the Little Swans performed by a moonlit lake and sweeping ballroom waltzes in the splendour of the royal palace. Anthony Dowell's glorious interpretation uses classical choreography created by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa for the ballet's revised 1895 version. Dramatic costumes emphasize the contrast between human and spirit worlds, while glowing lanterns, shimmering fabrics and designs inspired by the work of Peter Carl Fabergé create a magical setting.
Views: 3269092 Royal Opera House
Ballet Evolved: How ballet class has changed over the centuries
 
09:04
Barre work in ballet has changed considerably over the last 200 years. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk From its origins at the French court, the ballet class has evolved through the centuries. Join Ursula Hageli as she explores this ballet tradition with dancers of The Royal Ballet. Modern ballet class starts with increasingly complex exercises at the barre before the dancers move into the centre. It’s a format that has remained more or less unchanged since ballet technique first began to be codified in the early 19th century, by the influential teacher and dancer Carlo Blasis. But the exercises themselves have changed quite a bit, as former ballet mistress Ursula Hageli explains in this Ballet Evolved Insight. Ursula is joined by six Royal Ballet dancers to demonstrate how exercises have changed from Blasis’s era through the late 19th century and right up to the modern dancer: ‘we’re going to see side by side how the dancers have got much more supple and movements have got bigger’. One fundamental change in ballet since Blasis’s day is the dancers’ turn-out, which has ‘increased from 45 degrees to 90 degrees, which is actually a very difficult thing to do – we have to do that by holding onto the muscles at the top of the leg. However, when all this turn-out started it wasn’t quite as well thought through, so they had a vice to turn out the feet – which must have been excruciatingly painful’. An obvious difference to the class itself is the length of exercises. Class today at The Royal Ballet lasts about 90 minutes (45 minutes each at the barre and in the centre) and covers a wide range of movements. In Blasis’s day ‘the barre used to last just 15 minutes, because they just did two or three exercises and that was it. Today’s dancers are doing more exercises but of shorter duration’.
Views: 1253637 Royal Opera House
Sylvia – Act III solo (Darcey Bussell, The Royal Ballet)
 
02:12
Former Royal Ballet Principal dancer Darcey Bussell performs the Act III solo in Ashton's sparkling ballet, Sylvia. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/sylvia Frederick Ashton’s delightful full-length classical ballet is a charming feast for the senses, set to Delibes’ marvellous score. Sylvia was Frederick Ashton’s second full-length ballet, created in 1952 as a sparkling showpiece for his muse Margot Fonteyn. Ashton used Delibes’ gorgeous 1876 score – famously beloved by Tchaikovsky, who praised its ‘charm and elegance… its riches in melody, rhythm, harmony’. The ballet fell from the repertory but in 2004 was reconstructed by Christopher Newton for Ashton’s centenary – so rescuing from the archives a seminal work of Ashton’s English style. Delibes’ first-rank ballet music inspired Ashton to create some of his most inventive dance imagery. There is a wealth of detail and fun in every character, and in Sylvia herself Ashton created one of the most surprisingly wide-ranging Principal roles. From the powerful huntress of Act I to the artful, witty woman who schemes her escape from pirates, and the rosy bride of the final scene, she emerges as a marvellously layered character – her challenging choreography a test to each new generation of Ashtonians. Frederick Ashton created more than one hundred works during his lifetime (1904–88). For further information, please visit www.frederickashton.org.uk. This production was recorded live at the Royal Opera House in December 2005.
Views: 143916 Royal Opera House
Insight: Ballet Glossary - Arabesques
 
01:17
Discover more at http://www.roh.org.uk Romany Pajdak, Royal Ballet First Artist, demonstrates a series of arabesques. The arabesque is one of the most basic static poses in ballet, the dancer balances on one leg and extends the other out behind. The arms may be held in number of harmonious positions.
Views: 563256 Royal Opera House
Mayerling  –  Tavern scene (The Royal Ballet)
 
03:09
Mayara Magri as Mitzi, and Marcelino Sambé, Reece Clarke, Tomas Mock and Calvin Richardson as Four Hungarian Officers, and Steven McRae as Crown Prince Rudolf. Kenneth MacMillan’s Mayerling was filmed and screened live in cinemas on 15 October 2018. Find out more at https://www.roh.org.uk/productions/mayerling-by-kenneth-macmillan Mayerling is based on the true story of the deaths of Crown Prince Rudolf and his teenage mistress Mary Vetsera in 1889. This dark and intense ballet was created for The Royal Ballet in 1978 and is regarded by many as among Kenneth MacMillan's finest works. Orchestrated and arranged by John Lanchbery, the music of Franz Liszt sweeps the story to its intense conclusion, and sumptuous designs by Nicholas Georgiadis bring to life the formal, oppressive world of the Austro-Hungarian court. The large-scale crowd and court scenes show the whole Company off at its dramatic finest. But it is MacMillan's choreography for Rudolf, one of the most technically and emotionally demanding roles in the repertory for male dancers, that makes this ballet so iconic. Rudolf's emotional decline is charted through daring and visceral pas de deux with his mother, his wife and Mary Vetsera - choreography that pushes classical ballet to its limits.
Views: 65176 Royal Opera House
The Barber of Seville - 'Ecco, ridente in cielo' (Juan Diego Flórez, The Royal Opera)
 
03:59
Juan Diego Flórez as Count Almaviva in Act I of Gioachino Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/barbiere The 23-year-old Gioachino Rossini completed his masterpiece Il barbiere di Siviglia incredibly quickly – legend has it in just 13 days – which Rossini attributed to ‘facility and lots of instinct’. He drew on Pierre-Augustin Beaumarchais’ play Le Barbier de Seville – part of a dramatic trilogy that also inspired Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro. The opera is characterized by youthful energy and bold wit: qualities brought to the fore in Moshe Leiser and Patrice Caurier’s colourful production. Il barbiere di Siviglia has all the ingredients for comic chaos: an imprisoned young woman, her lecherous guardian and a young noble suitor. Skilfully plotting behind the scenes is Figaro – an irrepressible and inventive character in whom many have seen a resemblance to the young Rossini himself. The score fizzes with musical brilliance, from Figaro’s famous entrance aria ‘Largo al factotum’ to the frenzy of the Act I finale, when the five principal voices pile on top of each other. Within a few decades of its 1816 premiere, Il barbiere di Siviglia had been toured round the world, reaching opera houses in New York, Buenos Aires, Trinidad and Ecuador. It has remained one of the most prominent and popular operas in the repertory.
Views: 167774 Royal Opera House
Natalia Osipova, Carlos Acosta and Peter Wright in rehearsals for Giselle (The Royal Ballet)
 
05:46
Producer Peter Wright, Royal Ballet Principals Natalia Osipova, and Carlos Acosta in rehearsals for Giselle. They discuss the story, the characters and why it is such a romantic classic. www.roh.org.uk/giselle A Giselle Digital Guide is available to purchase from the ROH website, containing specially selected films, articles and exclusives to bring you closer to the production: http://www.roh.org.uk/publications/royal-opera-house-guide-to-giselle. Giselle is the quintessential Romantic ballet. It transformed the dance world when it was first performed in Paris in 1841 and remains at the centre of the classical repertory. Peter Wright's production for The Royal Ballet, which had its premiere in 1985, has had more than 550 performances. With its combination of memorable story and exquisite choreography, Giselle is the perfect way to discover classical ballet.
Views: 323195 Royal Opera House
La fille du régiment - 'Ah! mes amis' (Donizetti; Juan Diego Flórez, The Royal Opera)
 
02:11
Juan Diego Flórez sings the famous aria 'Ah! mes amis' from Donizetti's opera La fille du régiment. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk La Fille du régiment had its premiere at the Opéra-Comique in Paris in 1840. Its combination of comedy, genuine feeling and patriotic sentiment soon made it a national institution, and it was regularly revived on Bastille Day in France. The opera had a long absence from Covent Garden, but in 1966 Joan Sutherland reintroduced it to London. She played the irrepressible heroine, Marie, with Luciano Pavarotti as her lover, Tonio. La Fille returned to the Royal Opera House in 2007 in Laurent Pelly's delightful production, which has since toured the world. Pelly's production fizzes with exuberant humour. It features wonderfully inventive sets: large maps evoke the mountains of Tyrol, the regiment’s camp drowns in laundry and an armoured tank bursts into a drawing room. Gaetano Donizetti’s score weaves robust, military melodies with moments of pathos. Musical highlights include the bravura tenor aria 'Pour mon âme', with its vertical leaps to a succession of high Cs, and the delightful duet 'Quoi? vous m'aimez!' in which Tonio expresses his love for Marie.
Views: 70108 Royal Opera House
The Nutcracker – Sugar Plum pas de deux: Adagio (Nuñez, Muntagirov, The Royal Ballet)
 
06:02
A Christmas treat for the whole family and a classic with a special place in the hearts of ballet fans around the world. Principals of The Royal Ballet Marianela Nuñez and Vadim Muntagirov perform the Adagio from the Sugar Plum grand pas de deux in Act II of The Nutcracker. Find out more here https://www.roh.org.uk/productions/the-nutcracker-by-peter-wright Peter Wright's interpretation of The Nutcracker has been enchanting children and adults alike since its first performance by The Royal Ballet in 1984. Lev Ivanov's 1892 ballet combined with Tchaikovsky's sumptuous, iconic score are presented in a festive period setting with vivid designs to make this a charming and magical production. Loosely based on the story by E.T.A. Hoffmann, the ballet begins in the 19th-century German home of the Stahlbaums, where they are hosting a lively Christmas party. The period setting is captured in opulent detail by Julia Trevelyan Oman's designs, which include authentic Christmas tree decorations that are magically brought to life. Wright's choreography ingeniously incorporates surviving fragments of the ballet's original material, including the sublime pas de deux for the Sugar Plum Fairy and her Prince. But in emphasizing the relationship between Clara and the Nutcracker, the production also gains a touching subtext of first love.
Views: 306754 Royal Opera House
Jewels - Behind the Costumes (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Mal Barton, Costume Workshop Manager takes us through the costumes from each section of George Balanchine's ballet Jewels; Emeralds, Rubies and Diamonds. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/jewels-by-george-balanchine Watch the trailer for The Sleeping Beauty, a classic ballet with music by Tchaikovsky - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZL30OulLcA
Views: 281158 Royal Opera House
An introduction to opera's voice types (The Royal Opera)
 
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A selection of singers share their skills from the lowest voice type to the highest, demonstrating the power of the bass, baritone, tenor, mezzo-soprano, countertenor and soprano voices.
Views: 511645 Royal Opera House
Tamara Rojo and Carlos Acosta in Manon, 2004 (The Royal Ballet)
 
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Tamara Rojo as Manon and Carlos Acosta as Des Grieux in Act I of Kenneth MacMillan's ballet Manon. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/news/manon-dance-highlights-four-extended-pas-de-deux Kenneth MacMillan began work on Manon shortly after the birth of his only daughter. His source was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted twice for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score made from a patchwork of works by Massenet, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet's repertory. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon, bringing his customary psychological insight and the memories of his own impoverished upbringing. He described his heroine as 'not so much afraid of being poor as ashamed of being poor'. Designs by MacMillan's friend Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable poverty. MacMillan's spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux's impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan's earlier work, Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan's most heartbreaking dramas. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk
Views: 69848 Royal Opera House
How ballet dancers prepare pointe shoes for performance
 
04:14
Watch Edward Watson and Principal Mara Galeazzi as they take us behind-the-scenes to meet the individuals and see the effort that goes into preparing pointe shoes and footwear for each and every Royal Ballet performance. Give a gift online at http://www.roh.org.uk/pointeshoesappeal Anyone who makes an online donation to the Pointe Shoes Appeal will be automatically entered to win a signed pair of Mara Galeazzi's pointe shoes from her final Royal Ballet performance in Mayerling.
Views: 6376893 Royal Opera House
Dance of the Matadors, Don Quixote (The Royal Ballet)
 
03:20
Ryoichi Hirano as Espada and Laura Morera as Mercedes perform Dance of the Matadors with members of The Royal Ballet in Carlos Acosta's production of Don Quixote. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/donquixote Carlos Acosta, Principal Guest Artist of The Royal Ballet, created his first work for the Company in 2013. He chose one of his favourite ballets – Marius Petipa's Don Quixote, a joyful adaptation of Miguel de Cervantes's classic novel. Acosta's production has proved itself a firm audience favourite, acclaimed for its breathtakingly virtuoso dancing, eye-popping designs by Tim Hatley and the sheer energy and exuberance of the production as a whole. The adventures of the bumbling knight Don Quixote and his ever-faithful squire Sancho Panza have been the inspiration for countless ballets, of which Petipa's is one of the best loved. Acosta has danced the virtuoso role of Basilio many times, and brings that experience to his unique and vibrant vision of the story. Ludwig Minkus's score, created for Petipa, is full of Spanish flair and atmosphere. Don Quixote, with its famously bravura Act III pas de deux and infectious ebullience, is wonderfully entertaining.
Views: 225044 Royal Opera House
The Nutcracker – The Waltz of the Snowflakes (The Royal Ballet)
 
07:27
The Royal Ballet performs the Waltz of the Snowflakes in The Nutcracker, with Meaghan Grace Hinkis as Clara, Ricardo Cervera as the Nutcracker and Gary Avis as Drosselmeyer, recorded in 2012. Find out more at: http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/the-nutcracker-by-peter-wright Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without this seasonal favorite, in which a young girl's enchanted present leads her on a wonderful adventure. In this recording The Royal Ballet performs the Waltz of the Snowflakes in The Nutcracker, with Meaghan Grace Hinkis as Clara, Ricardo Cervera as the Nutcracker and Gary Avis as Drosselmeyer, accompanied by the London Oratory Junior Choir and the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, conducted by Koen Kessels, recorded in 2012. Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker score was commissioned by the director of the Russian Imperial Theatres, following the resounding success of Sleeping Beauty in 1890. Marius Petipa created the scenario – based on a fairytale by E. T. A. Hoffman – and Lev Ivanov provided the choreography. The Nutcracker was first performed in 1892 at the Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg. It initially had a poor reception, but its combination of enchanting choreography and an unforgettable score have since made it one of the best-loved of all ballets. In Peter Wright's classic production, the stage sparkles with theatrical magic – a Christmas tree grows before our eyes, toy soldiers come to life to fight the villainous Mouse King and Clara is whisked to the Land of Sweets on a golden sleigh. Tchaikovsky's score contains some of the best-known melodies in ballet, from the flurrying sounds of the Waltz of the Snowflakes to the dream-like Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and the vigorous Russian Dance. Julia Trevelyan Oman's designs draw upon 19th-century images of Christmas, making this a classic production for the festive season.
Views: 3748894 Royal Opera House
Monotones II rehearsal - The Royal Ballet
 
03:34
Edward Watson, Marianela Nuñez and Federico Bonelli rehearse Frederick Ashton's Monotones II with Anthony Dowell and Lyn Wallis. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/monotones-i-and-ii-by-frederick-ashton Monotones II will be screened in cinemas this Summer. During these screenings, Nehemiah Kish will replace Federico Bonelli. Frederick Ashton distilled the exquisite tranquility of Erik Satie's pieces in Monotones I and II, which display some of his most modernist choreography. Monotones II was created first and given its premiere at the Royal Opera House in 1965, accompanied by Satie's Trois Gymnopédies. Ashton created a second piece to Satie's Trois Gnossiennes (Monotones I), and the two were presented together the following year. Satie's Préludes d'Eginhard was played as an overture. Monotones I opens with a slow, serene pas de trois in a wonderful example of adagio classicism. The dancers remain on stage throughout the entire work, with their smooth lines of movement unbroken. Monotones II features another pas de trois that mirrors the controlled movements of the first. Satie's delicate music, coupled with Ashton's beautiful choreography, is wonderfully haunting.
Views: 113738 Royal Opera House
Ballet Evolved: Terre à terre exercises
 
04:23
Former Ballet Mistress of The Royal Ballet Ursula Hageli looks at the use of terre à terre exercises (where the feet barely leave the ground) in daily ballet class of the 19th century. With danced examples by (left to right) Fumi Kaneko, Tomas Mock, Gemma Pitchley-Gale, Marcelino Sambé, Yasmine Naghdi and Donald Thom. Ballet Evolved events explore the ballet through the centuries from its origins at the French court. It is one of a number of Insights held at the Royal Opera House. Find out more: http://www.roh.org.uk/insights
Views: 139017 Royal Opera House
Faust - ‘Avant de quitter ces lieux’ (Dmitri Hvorostovsky, The Royal Opera)
 
03:56
Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky sings Valentin's aria from act II of Gounod's opera Faust. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk Charles-François Gounod’s Faust was once one of the most famous and most performed of all operas: at Covent Garden it was heard every season between 1863 and 1911. Jules Barbier and Michel Carré’s libretto is a tale of romance, temptation, and the age-old battle between satanic powers and religion. It is based on Carré’s play Faust et Marguerite, which in turn is based on Part I of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s dramatic poem Faust, one of the great works of European literature. David McVicar’s lavish production, first seen in 2004, sets the action in the Paris of Gounod’s later years, on the eve of the Franco-Prussian War. Charles Edwards’s designs include a memorable Cabaret d’Enfer and an impressive reconstruction of the Church of Saint-Séverin. They vividly convey the clash between religion and hedonistic entertainment, and provide a powerful backdrop to Gounod’s score. Faust contains much-loved musical highlights including the memorable Soldiers’ Chorus, Méphistophélès’s rowdy ‘Song of the Golden Calf’, and Marguerite’s Jewel Song with its dazzling coloratura. The opera’s final scene includes an impassioned trio between Faust, Marguerite and Méphistophélès, as Marguerite struggles to resist temptation and gain salvation.
Views: 78125 Royal Opera House
Antonio Pappano discusses Wagner's 'Tristan' chord  (The Royal Opera)
 
04:51
Music Director, The Royal Opera Antonio Pappano introduces the Richard Wagner's 'Tristan' chord. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/tristan
Views: 46371 Royal Opera House

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