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Videos uploaded by user “Daniel Izzo”
How submarines work
 
02:12
How submarines work
Views: 620787 Daniel Izzo
U.S. Railroad History Map 1830 - 1990s
 
02:41
U.S. Railroad History Map 1830 - 1990s
Views: 114186 Daniel Izzo
How to use Microsoft  Access  ( part 2 of 13 )
 
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How to use Microsoft Access ( part 2 of 13 )Understanding Databases
Views: 56186 Daniel Izzo
The Gulf War 1991
 
03:00
The Gulf War 1991
Views: 88211 Daniel Izzo
History of Territorial  Expansion of the  United States
 
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History of Territorial Expansion of the United States
Views: 71744 Daniel Izzo
How film cameras work
 
01:24
How film cameras work
Views: 81014 Daniel Izzo
Inside The Lungs
 
01:35
Inside The Lungs
Views: 143998 Daniel Izzo
History of the American Civil  War  1861 - 1865  Map
 
04:41
History of the American Civil War Map
Views: 61649 Daniel Izzo
History of Ballet
 
02:22
History of Ballet
Views: 31967 Daniel Izzo
How Television broadcast works
 
01:50
How Television broadcast works
Views: 149218 Daniel Izzo
How the Body Works : Repair of Bone
 
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How the Body Works Repair of Bone The fracture of a bone is usually caused by direct violence or by a strong twisting strain. When a bone fractures the two fragments separate and in so doing tear the arteries in the Haversian systems that cross the fracture line. This damage results in the leakage of blood into the fracture, where it is trapped and soon clots. After a short time, the Haversian arteries go into spasm, causing the death of active bone cells not only at the fracture site, but also for some distance along the shaft. About two days after the break, the blood clot is invaded by capillaries and fibroblasts. The fibroblasts differentiate into bone-forming cells, or osteoblasts, and cells that form periosteal tissue on the outside of the bone. New tissue, called callus, surrounds the fracture and replaces the dead bone. The dead bone is absorbed and replaced by new bone, formed by the osteoblasts in the callus, which is remodeled by cells, called osteoclasts, to its original shape. This remodeling process is so effective that after a few months it is difficult to detect the fracture site.
Views: 502441 Daniel Izzo
How Radio  broadcast works
 
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How Radio broadcast works
Views: 25168 Daniel Izzo
How to use Microsoft  Access  ( part 6 of 13 )
 
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How to use Microsoft Access ( part 6 of 13 ) Sorting an Filtering Records
Views: 25888 Daniel Izzo
Solidarity Movement in Poland 1970-80s
 
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Solidarity Movement in Poland 1970-80s
Views: 21665 Daniel Izzo
History of World War One  1914 - 1918  Map
 
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History of World War One 1914 - 1918 Map
Views: 83955 Daniel Izzo
Musculoskeletal System
 
02:40
Musculoskeletal System
Views: 104702 Daniel Izzo
How a Television Works
 
01:24
How a Cathode Television Works
Views: 126304 Daniel Izzo
Winston Churchill: German surrender announcement May 7, 1945
 
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Winston Churchill: German surrender announcement May 7, 1945
Views: 249806 Daniel Izzo
Gulf War Map 1990 - 91
 
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Gulf War Map 1990 - 91
Views: 20907 Daniel Izzo
How Air Conditioners & Heat Exchangers Work
 
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How Air Conditioners & Heat Exchangers Work
Views: 119515 Daniel Izzo
How the Body Works : The Architecture of the Liver
 
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The Architecture of the Liver The liver is the largest organ in the body. Liver tissue is composed of a compact mass of multisided units, known as the hepatic lobules. Each lobule consists of a central vein, which acts as a tributary of the hepatic vein and conducts processed blood away from the lobule, surrounded by plates of liver cells. The liver receives blood from two sources, 80 percent, which carries digested food materials, arrives from the intestine via the portal vein and venules; the remaining twenty percent is oxygenated blood from the heart, which enters through the hepatic artery and arterioles. An exchange of materials takes place between the liver cells and the blood, which then passes into the central veins and returns to the general body circulation via the hepatic vein. Sinusoids, spaces between plates of liver cells composed of tributaries of the hepatic artery and portal vein, conduct the blood flow to the central vein. The bile canaliculus carries bile juice from the liver to branches of the bile duct which convey bile from the lobules to the gall bladder. When an adult is at rest, about two and a half pints of blood flow through the liver each minute.
Views: 292286 Daniel Izzo
Early civilizations
 
01:32
Early civilizations
Views: 16011 Daniel Izzo
History of the Korean War 1950 - 1953 Map
 
03:18
History of the Korean War 1950 - 1953 Map
Views: 58340 Daniel Izzo
How to use Microsoft Access ( part 12 of 13 )
 
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How to use Microsoft Access ( part 12 of 13 )
Views: 20902 Daniel Izzo
How Air Conditioners Work
 
01:07
How Air Conditioners Work
Views: 499569 Daniel Izzo
History of World War  Two  1939 - 1945 Map
 
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History of World War Two 1939 - 1945 Map
Views: 48755 Daniel Izzo
How Airplanes Work
 
01:13
How Airplanes Work
Views: 716460 Daniel Izzo
How Transistors Work
 
02:00
How Transistors Work
Views: 568657 Daniel Izzo
Television inventor : Philo Taylor Farnsworth (1906 -1971)
 
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Philo Taylor Farnsworth (1906 -1971) Invented the first completely electronic television
Views: 31442 Daniel Izzo
How the Body Works : Anatomy of the Hypothalamus
 
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How the Body Works Anatomy of the Hypothalamus Connected by many nerve tracts with the brain and spinal cord, the hypothalamus acts as a link between the endocrine system and the nervous system. It functions automatically, monitoring and regulating the autonomic nervous system as well as the state of the body's metabolism through eating, drinking, temperature control, sexual drives and "fight or flight" reactions. It also controls the menstrual cycle and is thought to contain a pleasure center. Finally, it directs hormones released by the anterior pituitary gland. The anatomy of the hypothalamus includes: The medial forebrain nerve bundle, which leads to the front area of the cerebral cortex. The fornix, a bundle of nerve fibers, which carries messages associated with memory from the limbic system. The "control centers", which are grouped together to form the core of the hypothalamus. The mamillothalamic tract, which is involved with the synthesis of emotions. The dorsal longitudinal bundle, which carries messages concerned with digestion to the brain stem. The pituitary portal system, which carries hypothalamic hormones to the anterior pituitary gland. The infundibular stalk, which connects the pituitary gland to the brain. The neurosecretory tracts, which channel hypothalamic hormones to the posterior pituitary gland, and the hypothalamic artery, which conducts oxygenated blood to the hypothalamus. Directly below the hypothalamus lies the anterior and posterior pituitary glands. The anterior pituitary gland secretes hormones under the control of the hypothalamus.
Views: 148010 Daniel Izzo
How the Body Works : Human Information Processing
 
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Human Information Processing This illustration shows the organization of the nerve cells responsible for human information processing, the vertical and horizontal position of the fibers, and the position of the blood vessels within the cortex. The convoluted covering gives it a large surface area within the restricted confines of the skull. The cerebral cortex is responsible for receiving, interpreting and storing information from the body and its external environment and organizing relevant responses to the incoming messages. Convolutions are the folds on the cortex. Each "hill" is a gyrus and each "valley" is a sulcus. The hills and valleys give the brain its wrinkled appearance. Fusiform, basket and stellate cells are all types of neurons present in the cortex. They communicate with each other and sift and sort out incoming information. Horizontal cells are found only in the top layer of the cortex. They communicate with the vertical fibers emerging from the depths of the cortex. Pyramidal cells have long axons which transmit information out of the cortex. Afferent fibers bring information from the body and sense organs into the cortex, where they are connected with the neurons that process it. Martinotti cells are found throughout the cortex. They are small cells with one long axon which runs vertically upward. Glial cells, or neuroglia , support and bind all the nerve cells together. They provide nutrition for the cells that they surround. It is not known if they are concerned with processing information.
Views: 51391 Daniel Izzo
How to use Microsoft  Access  ( part 3 of 13 )
 
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How to use Microsoft Access ( part 3 of 13 ) Creating a Database and a Table
Views: 44890 Daniel Izzo
How telephones work
 
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How telephones work
Views: 14786 Daniel Izzo
Venus de Milo -  ancient Greek statue
 
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Venus de Milo - ancient Greek statue
Views: 74545 Daniel Izzo
America in the 1950s
 
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America in the 1950s
Views: 256318 Daniel Izzo
Ocean Currents
 
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Ocean Currents
Views: 307109 Daniel Izzo
How the Body Works : Movement and the Cerebellum
 
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Movement and the Cerebellum The cerebellum, part of the hindbrain, is concerned with the regulation of coordination and balance. It is an oval-shaped structure with a central furrow, which is flanked on either side by a bulbous lobe. The furrow is called the vermis and the expanded lobes the hemispheres. The surface is covered with folds, or folia. In the illustration presented, a section through a folium has been drawn out and cut through to show its internal structure. The outer region of the cerebellum is known as the cortex, or gray matter. It contains two distinct layers of nerve cells, the molecular layer-containing stellate and basket cells, which process information within the cortex, and the granular layer-containing small granule cells and Golgi cells, which sift incoming information. The layers are separated from each other by a layer of purknje cells, which carry information concerning body movement out of the cerebellum. Beneath the cortex lies the white matter, which is composed of nerve fibers, mossy fibers and climbing fibers that pass in and out of the cerebellum. The Mossy fibers are a major route for information entering the cerebellum, while the climbing fibers carry information to the cells in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. The cerebellum lies below the occipital lobes of the brain's cerebral hemispheres.
Views: 77354 Daniel Izzo
Native American Totem Poles
 
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Native American Totem Poles
Views: 42327 Daniel Izzo
History of Computers
 
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History of Computers
Views: 11539 Daniel Izzo
Life in the Polar Regions
 
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Life in the Polar Regions ( Ice Worms ? )
Views: 43691 Daniel Izzo
How the Body Works : Center of Emotion and Memory
 
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How the Body Works Center of Emotion and Memory The limbic system, which is concerned with memory and learning, is also believed to be primarily involved in emotional responses. Emotions are the conscious result of the interaction between the activities of the cerebral cortex, the limbic system and the visceral organs of the body which produce specific physical changes. A number of theories have been postulated to explain this relationship between the body and mind. The emotional responses of any individual are, however, also a product of his knowledge and experience. The anatomy of the limbic system includes: The amygdaloid bodies, which contain both incoming and outgoing nerve fibers, and may help to regulate emotions, particularly agression. The fornix, a thick bundle of nerve fibers which forms the outgoing pathway from the hippocampus. The afferent fibers bring impulses into the dentate gyrus and the area of Ammon's horn. The dentate gyrus which lies within the hippocampal sulcus and although its function is not fully understood may relay impulses in the hippocampus. The subiculum is a region of cortex composed of up to six different cell layers and a multitude of nerve pathways. Ammon's horn, which merges with the subiculum and contains ovoid and pyramidal cells, the function of which are thought to be associated with memory. The efferent fibers, which carry information out from Ammon's horn to other regions of the brain. The hippocampus, which is composed of folded layers of cells and fibers and is associated with emotions, learning and short-term memory. The parahippocampal gyrus, a highly specialized area of nerve cells concerned with memory pathways. The mammillary bodies, which have incoming and outgoing nerve fibers and acts as a relay station between the limbic system and the brain. ...and the septum pelucidum, which links the amygdala with the hypothalamus and is believed to be concerned with pleasure reactions.
Views: 273931 Daniel Izzo
How the Body Works : The Rh Factor
 
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The Rh Factor There are many different blood groups of which the two most important are the ABO and the Rhesus or Rh groupings. More than 85 percent of the world's population possess the Rh antigen in their blood---and are considered Rh positive. In all other individuals the antigen is lacking and they are classified as Rh negative. Should the antigen enter the bloodstream of an Rh negative person, serious consequences follow. If a Rh negative woman is impregnated by a Rh positive man, the fetus may be Rh positive, too. If the Rh antigen enters the maternal bloodstream via the placenta, it induces the woman to produce anti-Rh antibodies, which could attack subsequent Rh positive fetuses, causing jaundice and possibly death. Treatment in such cases is to transfuse the baby immediately after birth with Rh negative blood.
Views: 236350 Daniel Izzo
Tooth decay
 
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Tooth decay
Views: 16389 Daniel Izzo
What is ozone ?
 
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What is ozone ?
Views: 51331 Daniel Izzo
Magellan's Voyage 1519
 
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Magellan's Voyage 1519
Views: 63611 Daniel Izzo
The Human Voice System
 
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The Human Voice System
Views: 123588 Daniel Izzo
How canals work
 
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How canals work
Views: 670981 Daniel Izzo
Korean War 1950 - 1953
 
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Korean War 1950 - 1953
Views: 77733 Daniel Izzo
Scientific Revolutions - Stephen Gould 1941 - 2002
 
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Stephen Jay Gould (September 10, 1941 May 20, 2002) was a prominent American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. He was also one of the most influential and widely read writers of popular science of his generation. Gould spent most of his career teaching at Harvard University and working at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. In the latter years of his life, Gould also taught biology and evolution at New York University near his home in SoHo.
Views: 12769 Daniel Izzo
How  volcanoes work
 
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How volcanoes work
Views: 109030 Daniel Izzo