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The Most Extreme Births In The Animal Kingdom
 
03:46
There is no human mom in this world who would say giving birth is easy peasy. But there are some mothers out there in the animal kingdom who go through the extreme to give birth to their offsprings. Here is why mothers all around the earth deserve more than a thank you. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 3559598 Science Insider
Why Cockroaches Are So Hard To Kill
 
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Cockroaches are one of the most widespread and resilient creatures on this planet. They are practically everywhere around us, hiding in the walls, sewers, and perhaps your cupboard. They are also one of the most hated creatures by humans. If you are like most people, you will become determined to kill all of the roaches when you see them in your house. Despite such hatred towards them, how do cockroaches manage to thrive all around the globe? Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: You might not want to think about this but over 3,500 species of cockroaches live on this planet. The good news? Only about 30 of those species have adapted to live around humans. The bad news? 30 species of cockroaches can live around us! Roaches are one of the most common pests in the US. So, it's no surprise that humans are always trying to kill them. But no matter how many times we stomp them, squash them, and bomb them with toxic chemicals, these pesky pests always seem to pop up time and time again. So what's going on? Let's take a closer look at the roach you probably know better than you'd like: Periplaneta Americana. AKA: the American Cockroach. But this name is misleading. This guy is actually from Africa, not America. It made its way to the US by infesting boats in the 16th century. And has been spreading to almost every corner in the world ever since. Turns out, it's one of the largest species of cockroach around. But that's not the only big thing about it. New research has revealed that it has a massive genome — one of the largest of any studied insect! And many of these genes are exactly what make this roach a master survivor. Let's start with its genes associated with something called chemoreception. That's how roaches smell and taste their environment. Turns out, they're actually way better at sniffing out and eating food than most other insects. The American roach has 154 olfactory receptors for smell and 544 gustatory receptors for taste — more than any other insect on the planet! As a result, these cockroaches are not picky eaters. Sure, they like cheese, meat, and sugar like the rest of us. But they'll also go for things like cardboard, book bindings, human toenails, rotting meat, blood, excrement, and even each other. That's right, these roaches have been known to eat other dead or crippled cockroaches — all in the name of survival. It sounds gross, but this diverse diet makes it easy to find a meal just about anywhere, even if it's poisonous to most animals. This roach has a bunch of genes called cytochrome p450s, which help it withstand poisonous chemicals like peppermint. These genes code for detoxification enzymes, which keep the insects safe. On top of that, this roach has a super-strong immune system that seeks out and kills harmful microbes and fungi, making the most unsanitary environment look like a 5-star hotel to the American cockroach. Not gross enough, yet? Well consider this: cockroaches can live for nearly a week without their heads. Yeah, that's not a myth. They don't have a highly-pressurized network of blood vessels like humans, so they don't bleed out. Instead, their necks actually seal off the opening. They can't regenerate a whole head, but roaches do have an impressive set of regenerative superpowers. For up to the first two years of its life, the American roach goes through a series of regenerative molts as it matures into an adult. During a single molt stage, it can replace lost limbs. And over a series of molts, it can regrow antennae and even its eyes. Roaches may be hard to kill, but there's an easy way to help keep them clear of your kitchen — Cleanliness! A roach won't just survive in unsanitary conditions but actually enjoys it. Its heightened senses mean it actually relishes rotting food. So, store food in airtight containers, cover trash bins, and keep your basement dry. It might also be smart to plug holes in your walls, unused electrical outlets, and especially drains since — get this — roaches can use your plumbing to climb from sewers to your bathroom sink.
Views: 3183548 Science Insider
What Happens If You Hold Your Pee In For Too Long
 
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Everyone holds in their pee every now and then. And that's okay! Just don't do it too often, or it could lead to some serious problems down the road. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: You’re about an hour and a half into the movie and, boy, are you regretting that large soda. You can hold it... but should you? Peeing is pretty important. Your kidneys filter excess water and waste out of your blood and that urine needs somewhere to go: your bladder. Normally, it’ll hold 1-2 cups comfortably. But if you make a habit of holding your pee for long periods of time, you can actually stretch your bladder to easily hold even more. Case in point, one study found that nurses who often held it in all day due to job constraints had nearly double the normal bladder capacity! And they were totally fine. But this doesn’t mean you should hold it in if you can help it. Because your bladder may not be the only thing to stretch. You may also stretch your external sphincter muscles. Those are important muscles connected to the outside of your bladder that are the gate-keepers of your golden liquid. Clench them and you hold in the gold. Relax them and you release the flood! But if you overstretch them, you can actually lose control. This is rare, and usually takes decades of holding it too long to reach that point, but once you do, it can lead to some awkward or even dangerous situations. For example, with less overall control, you risk leaking urine when your bladder is full and not emptying it all the way when you finally do go. Not only can this increase your need to urinate more often since your bladder fills up quicker, it can also lead to a serious disorder called urinary retention, where you end up with too much urine in your bladder for too long. And since your bladder is basically a warm, wet bag of body waste, it’s the PERFECT breeding ground for harmful bacteria that’ll cause all sorts of damage. Even worse, if you’re really unlucky and retain too much urine, it may back up into your kidneys. Which could lead to kidney failure, and ultimately death. The good news is that you’re more likely to just lose control of your muscles and pee waaaay before your bladder hits that point. But why not just reduce the risk all together and go to the bathroom? Ok, ok, we get it. That movie is absolutely gripping. Luckily... You’ll be fine if you only hold it in for a short time, every once in a while. So go ahead, hang in there... just don’t make a habit of it.
Views: 3273766 Science Insider
How Big Is The Universe?
 
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Carl Sagan told us that there are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on all of the Earth's beaches. At the same time, there are more H2O molecules in just 10 drops of water than there are stars. Ranging from the unimaginably small to the unimaginably big, the scale of the universe is mind-boggling. Watch to try to wrap your head around it. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 1418788 Science Insider
How Smartphones Affect Your Sleep
 
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Staring at screens right before sleep turns out to be a lot worse than previously thought. Dr. Dan Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, lays out all of the negative effects bedtime screen viewing can have on the brain and body. ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 1496805 Science Insider
What Happens When A Night Owl Wakes Up Early
 
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There is a lot of advice out there about how to get the best night of sleep. But the fact that you can't sleep might not be your fault. It turns out, night owls have an internal clock that functions differently. Forcing them to wake up early could have serious health consequences. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: There is plenty of advice for how to improve your sleep. Go to bed at the same time. Avoid digital screens after dark. And don’t hit snooze. But it all comes down to the same assumption: That YOU’RE doing something wrong. When, in fact, it may not be your fault, at all. Inside practically every organism on Earth there’s a clock that keeps order. Known as the circadian rhythm. For humans, it’s located in the part of our brains called the hypothalamus. And while it’s most famous for controlling our sleep cycles… it’s also responsible for helping primary organs like the brain, heart, and lungs, work in harmony. But not everyone’s circadian rhythm is the same. Night owls, for instance, generally feel tired later than early birds. Often because they produce high amounts of the sleep hormone, melatonin, later at night. And for most of human history that didn’t matter — since night owls could protect their tribes from nocturnal predators or their cities from cunning conquerors — but society has MADE it a problem in recent decades. An estimated 80% of Americans follow daily schedules that fall between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Yet, nearly a third of the population considers themselves night owls. Which means they’d be better off with a schedule that looks more like this. This phenomenon is called social jetlag. It’s like the jetlag you feel after a long plane trip… but worse because it doesn’t disappear after a few days. And social jetlag is taking its toll on night owls of the world. Because, even if you get the recommended amount of sleep… knocking your circadian rhythm out of whack has consequences. For example, one study found that for every hour your circadian rhythm is out of syn …your risk of obesity increases by 33%. Also increasing your risk of the many health complications associated with obesity. And the problem isn’t just a physical one. In another study, people whose circadian rhythms were more than 2 hours off… reported notably more severe symptoms of depression. And since your circadian rhythm tends to shift as you age… social jetlag is especially apparent in teens. In fact, the CDC warns that most public schools across America start too early, before 8:30. Which, according to the nonprofit “Rand Corporation,” is costing the country $9 billion a year from mainly lost academic performance and car crashes from tired teens behind the wheel. Luckily, the circadian rhythm isn’t set in stone. Turns out, it’s largely triggered by light signals that strike your eye. So, when you first wake up, get outside and soak up some morning sun… or if that’s out of the question, make sure your home is well lit. It might just brighten your morning a little more.
Views: 609005 Science Insider
Why You Can't Mix Blood Types
 
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While blood types have been around for at least 20 million years, doctors have only known about them for about 116 years. Prior to the 1900s, countless people died when they were injected with the wrong type of blood. This is because blood is composed of proteins called antigens that, when mixed with the wrong type, fight each other as if you're body was fighting an infection. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 245958 Science Insider
The Tallest Lifeforms Of All Time
 
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If you doubled in size, your weight would be eight times greater. That’s the trouble with growing tall. Gravity’s pull is keeping us all down. But there are a few earthly giants that have fought gravity and won.  Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: If you doubled in size, your weight would be 8 times greater. That’s the trouble with growing tall. Gravity’s pull is keeping us all down. But there are a few earthly giants that have fought gravity and won. The key to growing tall is how you use your energy. That’s why the tallest trees outrank any animal on Earth. Because trees spend all their energy on one thing- growing taller than their fellow neighbors. And there are two trees that are the best growers of them all- giant Redwoods and Mountain Ashes. Redwoods are renowned as the tallest life forms on Earth. But some experts think that Mountain Ashes could grow even taller if humans would stop cutting them down. In fact, the tallest Mountain Ash was just 1 meter shorter than the tallest Redwood. Unlike plants, animals spend energy on all sorts of tasks like eating, walking, and staying warm. So, they can't grow as tall. But it doesn't mean they're small, either. If you measured this African Elephant from shoulder to ground it would actually be taller than a Giraffe! But thanks to their long, strong necks, giraffes are the tallest animals alive. And if we look at animals throughout Earth’s history, dinosaurs eclipse them all. These towering Sauropods were the biggest of the bunch. In fact, the top 10 list of tallest animals in history? All dinosaurs. But, what if we looked at the longest lifeforms too? If you balance the longest Saltwater Crocodile on its nose, it would tie the Giraffe! And if we ignore legs, it gets even better! Tip to tail, the Green Anaconda nearly doubles the height of the tallest Giraffe on record. But these land dwellers have nothing on animals of the deep. Supported by water, sea life can practically ignore gravity. Which means they can grow much larger. Take the Blue Whale for example. It’s the most massive animal of all time. The entire cast of Broadway’s “The Lion King” can fit on its tongue! But it should be careful not to get tangled up in the tentacles of a Lion’s Mane Jellyfish, which makes a Giant Squid look small by comparison. Now, the biggest fish alive is the Whale Shark. And if we look into the past, things get even bigger. And where do humans fit into all this? Somewhere near the top, actually. Humans are bigger than 87.6% of mammals on Earth. And the average Dutchman is the tallest of them all. So, there’s no reason to ever feel small again, especially if you’re from the Netherlands. Fun Fact: The longest lifeform of all time isn’t a plant or animal at all. It’s a Honey Fungus and the biggest one goes on for 3.8 kilometers underneath a forest in Oregon.
Views: 2275901 Science Insider
Undersea Cables Power The Internet
 
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Every time you visit a web page or send an email, data is being sent and received through an intricate cable system that stretches around the globe. Since the 1850s, we've been laying cables across oceans to become better connected. Today, there are hundreds of thousands of miles of fiber optic cables constantly transmitting data between nations. Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 690911 Science Insider
How Hamsters Can Stuff So Much Food In Their Cheeks
 
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Hamsters can stuff their cheeks with up to 20% of their body weight. Most of the time, they fill their cheeks with food, but sometimes mother hamsters store their babies in their cheeks for protection. Hamster cheeks contain pouches that resemble small deflated balloons. As food enters, the pouch expands and retractor muscles squeeze the pouch and pull food back.  See more from April's Animals: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgTpLnSqzJntGjHLfuE2WNA Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: How is it doing that?!! Hamsters, like Soda Pop, can stuff up to 20% of their body weight into their cheeks. For comparison, that’s like the average person carrying around 30 extra pounds of food—or about 120 quarter pounders. It would be a cool party trick, but not very comfortable…or, let’s face it, even possible. That’s where hamsters are different. But they don’t stuff their faces for parties … or even because they’re hungry. They do it to survive. In the wild—yes, there are actually wild hamsters—they eat all kinds of food—leaves, shoots, veggies, and fruit. What they don’t consume right away, they store in those cheeks, which have pouches that extend halfway down their body and expand like a balloon. Thank goodness we don’t have anything like that because it would probably look a little strange. But hamsters NEED to stuff their faces, no matter how goofy it might look. In fact, they have to eat around every 2 hours to function normally. But foraging for food this frequently would make them easy prey. Instead, they collect food at night, and what they don’t store they snack on along the way. So during the day they can hide from predators and munch on their hoard in safety. And, thanks to the pouches in their cheeks that stockpile can get enormous. Hamster burrows have been found with nearly 200 lbs of stored food! These cheeks also come with special retractor muscles that help the hamster stuff itself to maximum capacity. If you ever watch this in action you may notice that it reorients the food after plopping it in its mouth. What it’s actually doing is angling the food so it easily slips to the back of the pouch as more comes in. Once the food is well on its way—that’s when the retractor muscles come into play. When the pouch stretches, the muscles contract which pushes the food toward the back, preventing it from clogging up. Pretty impressive stuff! But that’s not as impressive as some of the other things hamsters can do with their cheeks. For starters, some species will hide their babies inside these pouches to keep them safe. And there are reports that others can inflate their pouches with air and use it as a flotation device for swimming! But DON’T try this at home. Only certain wild species do this, and we don’t want you to drown your poor hamster. We’d rather have you sit and enjoy the incredible cuteness of Soda Pop. Fun fact: Hamsters can run over 5 miles in a 24 hour period.
Views: 228049 Science Insider
Is Marrying Your Cousin Actually Dangerous?
 
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Do babies born between two cousins actually have a higher chance of having birth defects? Understanding basic genetic principles will help with this question. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: What did Queen Victoria, Charles Darwin, and Albert Einstein have in common? They all married their first cousins. You’d think Darwin of all people would know better. After all, mating with a close relative passes on bad genes that lead to deadly genetic mutations, right? Today marrying your first cousin is illegal in 24 US states. But for most of Western history, people had to marry whoever lived nearby, which oftentimes meant marrying within the extended family. In fact, between 1650-1850, the average married couple was fourth cousins. So, they had the same great-great-great-grandparents. Genetically speaking that means they shared 0.20% of their DNA. Not much when you compare it to third(0.78%), second(3.13%), and especially first cousins(12.5%). And, the more DNA you share, the greater the chance your offspring will have a genetic disease — like cystic fibrosis or sickle-cell anemia. But here’s the thing: You don’t have to be sick in order to give your child a genetic disease. Take cystic fibrosis. It’s caused by a defect in the CFTR gene. But you need two copies of the defective gene to actually get the disease. So, if you only have one defective copy, you’re unaffected. Instead, you’re what’s called a carrier. Now, if one carrier mates with a non-carrier, there’s no risk of the kids getting sick. But when both parents carry a defective copy of CFTR, then the kids have a 25% chance of inheriting two copies of the gene and having the disease. So to see how dangerous it is to marry your first cousin, we need to calculate the chances that two first cousins both carry a copy of the same genetic disease. Since they share a set of grandparents, we’ll start there. Now it becomes a game of “what ifs”: What if both grandparents are carriers vs. just one? What if one of their children is a carrier vs. none at all? And what if those children marry other carriers, or not? It can get very complicated, very quickly. But scientists have crunched the numbers and it turns out the risk that the cousins have a kid who inherits a genetic disease is 4-7%. For the general population, it’s 3-4%. So, not a big deal right? Here’s the catch: That’s the odds for one genetic disease. But there are thousands that could be hiding in your family tree. Plus, if your kids also marry their first cousins and their kids marry their first cousins it’s a recipe for disaster. Because instead of introducing new, potentially helpful genes into the family gene pool, you’re recycling the old — and possibly dangerous — ones. Take Emperor Ferdinand I of Austria. His parents were first cousins twice over! And when he was born, he wasn’t especially healthy. So, as far as marrying your cousin is concerned, you shouldn’t make it a family tradition.
Views: 1294994 Science Insider
Why Marijuana Gives You The Munchies
 
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Marijuana can have various effects on your body. But what is it about weed that makes you so hungry? Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 111595 Science Insider
The Science Of Hitting A Major League Fastball
 
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Hitters only have 125 milliseconds to gauge the average Major League fastball – less than the blink of an eye. Which begs the question: how is it humanly possible? Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ----------------------------------------­---------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 83480 Science Insider
What Happens When You Stare At The Sun For Too Long
 
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We all know the harmful effects of the sun touching our skin, so we ready ourselves with sunscreen to block the rays. But what about our eyes? What would happen if we happened to stare directly at the sun?  Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Whether it’s to map the stars, spy on other planets, or study the sun, humans have been looking to the skies for millennia. But some objects are safer to observe than others.  For example, astronomer Mark Thompson put a pig’s eye behind a regular telescope aimed at the sun and it burned a hole straight through the lens in about 20 seconds. Now, looking at the sun through a telescope is an especially terrible idea but just how bad is it to glance up with the naked eye? On a clear day, the sun shines up to 5,000 times brighter than an average light bulb. When something that bright strikes your eye, a few things can happen. If it’s only for a moment, the worst you’ll experience is a blurry splotch on your vision called an after image.  Normally, light reaches the retina at the back of your eye, where it triggers photoreceptors that relay the information to your brain. This is how you are able to see anything. But bombard them with too much light at once, and you can actually damage the cells and proteins that help them process light. Since your retina has no pain receptors, the damage won’t hurt, but it will leave that blurry splotch on your vision. Usually, it clears up in a few minutes that is, unless you keep staring. Now, you’re doing more than just overloading your retina. For starters, you’re giving your eyes an abnormally high dose of UV radiation the same stuff that causes sunburns. Like your skin, the cornea at the front of your eye can also burn. And that will hurt. The cornea protects the rest of your eye and is therefore covered in pain receptors that alert you whenever a pesky eyelash is on the loose.  But UV radiation isn’t the only issue. Too much visible light can penetrate your eye and damage the retinal tissue, which causes a condition called solar retinitis. This means parts of your retina can no longer process light normally, so you can end up with entire chunks of your vision blurred out. Depending on the extent of the damage, recovery can take weeks, months, and in severe cases over a year. But in rare cases, the damage is so extreme it never heals, leading to a rare condition called solar retinopathy. This usually only shows up in reckless eclipse gazers. Turns out, during a solar eclipse, most of the sun’s light is blocked, which actually can trick your brain into thinking it’s safe to stare. Normally, our bodies have a built-in defense mechanism against staring at the sun. Specifically, when we squint we look up, which minimizes the amount of light coming in and protects our cornea and retina. But during a solar eclipse, the sun doesn’t appear bright enough to trigger our defense mechanisms so we can end up staring for longer than is safe. Suffice it to say, there’s nothing good about staring at the sun. So do your eyes a favor and avoid looking at it. After all, there are around 6,000 stars in the night sky you can safely observe for as long as you wish.
Views: 337033 Science Insider
Why You Shouldn't Pop Your Pimples
 
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Acne is the most common skin disease, according to the National Institute of Health. Even if it may ease the pain or the unsightly pus, dermatologist Michelle Rodrigues explains in an article on The Conversation that we should not pop them. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsi... Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_ins... Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 1862966 Science Insider
Why Cities Can’t Get Rid Of Rats
 
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Living in a city does not make you any less susceptible to seeing a rat. We try really hard to get rid of these pesky pests, but they seem to always slink around some corner of an alley you are walking down. Here is the answer to why rats are so hard to get rid of from your city.  Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: Wormtail. Professor Ratigan. The R.O.U.S. Pop culture has given rats a bad rep. And it’s understandable why. Take northeastern India’s rat flood. Twice a century, rats swarm when bamboo forests drop about 80 tons of seeds. After they devour the seeds, they devastate local agriculture. In the 1960s, the resulting famine was so bad, it lead to a major political uprising. It’s no wonder that the technical term for a group of rats is a “mischief”! And they’re not just a problem for farmers. These crafty rodents are the ultimate urbanites. Meet your average city rats: Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus. These rats live pretty much wherever we do. Especially in cities. Take New York City, for example. We don’t know exactly how many rats call the Big Apple home. But a 2014 study gave a ballpark estimate of 2 million rats. That means for heavily-infested areas you could have several rats per person! And in some ways, rats are better suited for living in cities than people. They can climb brick walls, “tightrope walk” over telephone cables, and their incisors grow 14 inches a year. Which lets them gnaw into anything — including everywhere you don’t want them. But their most powerful ability? Rats are clever. Too clever. Scientists have shown that rats can learn to use tools. And when offered the choice between a chocolate and freeing a trapped friend. Rats chose to free their friend over chocolate!  Translate those smarts to the real world and rats easily avoid traps. Trying to poison them won’t help much either. Rats are extremely patient when it comes to new foods. They’ll taste just a tiny portion at first, wait to see if that food makes them sick and only then, consume the rest if it’s safe. This is called “delayed learning” and it’s why rats are notoriously difficult to poison. Plus, they can develop resistance to many poisons over time so even outwitting them might not work in the long run. Another major issue is that rats reproduce quickly. A single doe usually has 8-12 pups every 8 weeks! And those babies can have pups of their own after only 5 weeks!  So as long as they have access to food, rat populations will rebound from just about any attack. The only attack they can’t handle is improved sanitation.  And cities are using that to their advantage. In 2017, for example, New York City launched a $32 million war plan against its rats. Eliminate 70% of the rats in its 10 most-infested neighborhoods.  The plan is simple. Cut off their food source. You see, NYC produces around 33 million tons of trash a year — more than any other city on Earth! The trash piles aren’t getting any smaller but the city can at least make it harder for rats to reach by replacing traditional trash compactors with a mailbox style opening. Will NYC succeed by the end of 2018, as proposed? Judging from the thousands of years where rats came out on top it sounds a tad optimistic. While wild rats are problematic pests, pet fancy rats are another story. They don’t spread disease and are social, smart, and easily trainable. And get this, one amazing study found that rats giggle when you tickle them!
Views: 393971 Science Insider
Is Eating Humans Actually Unhealthy?
 
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Cannibalism is a clear taboo in our society. But, putting ethics aside, what are the other reasons why you should not eat other humans?  Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: Did you know that cannibalism used to be a popular medical remedy? That’s right! In the 17th century, well before Advil Europeans would ingest ground up mummies for headaches. And human fat, blood, and bone were used to treat everything from gout to nosebleeds.  Yet cannibalism is largely absent and morally frowned upon in today. But let’s forget the social quagmire. There are plenty of reasons why you shouldn’t eat people these days. For starters, we now know that human meat is a surprisingly low source of calories compared to other red meat. According to one study human muscle contains about 1,300 calories per kilogram. That’s less than beef and nothing compared to bear and boar meat. Now, you might think this would actually make human burgers a great low-cal alternative until you remember you’re probably trying to eat humans because you’re starving to death. So, low-cal is the opposite of what you want. Plus it’s not worth taking the risk — if you can help it. Turns out, we carry some pretty nasty diseases that make 24-hour food poisoning look like the sniffles. Eat someone raw, and you risk contracting any blood-borne diseases they carried. But even if you cook the meat, it still won’t always go well for you. Case in point are the Fore people of Papua New Guinea. They would eat the body and brain of deceased family members out of cultural tradition. But that practice stopped after hundreds of people died in the 1950s and ‘60s from an otherwise rare neurological disorder which they contracted from eating infected human brains. Turns out, the brain tissue contained prions — deadly misfolded proteins that form spongy holes in your brain. They survive the cooking process and, if eaten, are highly contagious. On the legal side of things, cannibalism falls into a gray area. Oddly enough, cannibalism itself is not illegal in the US or UK, but you probably committed some crime along the way to get that slab of meat. Grave robbing, desecration of a corpse, murder, or maybe all of the above? One exception that won’t put you behind bars, is if you eat … yourself! Yup, that’s a thing. It’s called autocannibalism. The most common example today, called placentophagy, is when a woman eats her placenta after giving birth. The idea is that it can raise energy levels and reduce the risk of postpartum depression by stabilizing hormones. But the science is still out on whether there’s any real benefit. Regardless, this ancient practice has recently found new life in Western culture. Kim Kardashian and Alicia Silverstone have reportedly done it. And there are numerous US companies that will grind your placenta into a powder so you can take it like any other vitamin supplement.  But the CDC warns that even this cutting-edge form of cannibalism is a bad idea. Because it can transfer harmful bacteria from mother to child.  So, if you have a hankering for human, maybe try some pork instead. After all — that’s what we taste like. Wait … we obviously mean: ACCORDING TO CANNIBALS ANYWAYS!
Views: 2471293 Science Insider
Here's What Will Happen When The Sun Dies
 
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The Sun is currently in the middle of the stable section of its life cycle, and will stay there for the next 4.5 to 5.5 billion years. As it gets closer to depleting its hydrogen supply, there will be severe consequences for life on Earth. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsi... Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_ins... Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 227458 Science Insider
How Social Media Is Rewiring Our Brains
 
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Social media is dominating most of our attention throughout the day. Yet, is it truly changing our face-to-face relationships? Dr. Dan Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine reveals how social media is actually physically rewiring our brains. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsi... Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_ins... Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 171041 Science Insider
5 Ways The World Could End
 
02:52
The end of the world is not solely a science fiction plot. A day will come when the Earth will cease to exist. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 297389 Science Insider
Pluto And Charon: A Love Story
 
02:20
NASA's New Horizons spacecraft took us to Pluto for the first time in July 2015. Scientists are astonished by the incredible features they've observed on the dwarf planet, including a 1,000 mile wide region covered in nitrogen snow that resembles a heart. But we have reason to believe Pluto's heart is a bit warmer than the ice the covers it. Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ----------------------------------------­---------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 39959 Science Insider
Evolution Of The Universe In 3 Minutes
 
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Over 13 billion years ago, the entire universe was contained in a singularity tinier than a proton. So how did we get from there to here? Here's the abbreviated version of what we know (so far) about the story of everything. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsi... Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_ins... Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 87784 Science Insider
What Humans Living On Mars Will Look Like In 1,000 Years
 
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Colonizing Mars might be the best chance to ensure the human species survival in the future. In order to adapt to Mar’s hostile living conditions, our bodies will evolve in ways that might end up with a completely new species of human. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 80941 Science Insider
Real Meaning Behind The Word "Meme"
 
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Today, the word "meme" is typically used to describe a funny photo with text that gets passed around online. But Richard Dawkins coined the term years before the World Wide Web even existed. Dawkins in a distinguished evolutionary biologist and writer. He has authored several books, the most recent being "Brief Candle in the Dark: My Life in Science." Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsi... Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_ins... Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 91936 Science Insider
Is There A Better Planet Out There For Us?
 
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The discovery of several Earth-like planets outside the solar system has opened the possibilities of expanding our horizons and establish out first interstellar colonies. What would life be like on these 'super-Earths'? And if we ever got there... would we be able to leave? Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Astronomers have found dozens of potentially habitable planets outside of our solar system. That’s dozens of chances to discover the first alien life! Or plenty of places we could park our first interstellar colonies! But with so many options, how do we know which is best? You might think the most Earth-like planets should be top of our list. After all, we've got water, land, an atmosphere, and trillions of life forms lapping it all up. But according to a small group of researchers, there are bigger and better planets out there. They’re called super-Earths. Super-Earths may be some of the most common planets in our galaxy. Since 2009, the Kepler Space Telescope has discovered about 4,000 exoplanets. 30% of them are super-earths. And a few percent of those super-earths orbit within their host star’s habitable zone: That’s a Goldilocks zone where the planet’s surface is just the right temperature for liquid water. Not too cold or too hot. Now, there’s a chance that some of these super-Earth’s aren’t rocky worlds like Earth. The larger ones could be made of mostly hydrogen and helium gas like Jupiter and Saturn which would not be hospitable for life. But the reality is, astronomers are still gathering details as more data comes in. So, in the meantime, we’ll explore what life on a rocky, habitable super-Earth might be like. Liquid water is just the start. These planets can be almost double Earth’s radius and up to 10 times more massive. And all that extra mass is what researchers think could really make super-Earth’s the perfect home. Because more massive planets have a stronger gravitational pull. Super-Earth Kepler 20b, for example, is nearly double the size of Earth and is 10 times more massive. Making its surface gravity almost 3 times stronger. That stronger gravity means the planet can hold on to more air molecules forming a thicker atmosphere. Which is great for protection against harmful space radiation. It also means mountains and hills would erode faster leaving a relatively flatter surface compared to Earth. Which might sound boring but scientists think this could actually spawn dozens of shallow islands across the planet. Which, in turn, could be the perfect place for life to form and evolve. “Just as biodiversity in Earth’s oceans is richest in shallow waters near coastlines, such an ‘archipelago world’ might be enormously advantageous to life.” There’s just one problem leaving this tropical paradise would be extremely difficult. The escape velocity on Kepler 20b is more than double compared to Earth’s. Which means either rockets would need more fuel to reach their destinations. For example, a mission similar to the Apollo moon landings would require twice the amount of fuel or, rockets could only carry a fraction of the payload. For instance, SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy can launch 50,000 kilograms of payload into Earth’s orbit whereas it could only launch 40 kilograms into orbit around a super-Earth like Kepler 20b. That’s about the weight of a German Shepherd. Suffice it to say, leaving a super-Earth would be a far greater challenge. But if it looked like this, would you really want to say goodbye? We’ll never know for sure until we visit one. What do you want to know about space? Leave your queries in the comments below. And thanks for watching.
Views: 130335 Science Insider
What Having A Dog Does To Your Brain And Body
 
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Your pets have a larger effect on your body and brain than you might think. They have the ability to increase levels of oxytocin in the brain, bringing you a state of calm. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Narrator: Puppies, they're the furry friends we take for granted. But, how does having one affect us?  Meg Olmert: My name is Meg Olmert and I'm the author of "Made For Each Other: the biology of the human-animal bond." Our journey with dogs began about 45,000 years ago according to the latest archeological evidence. It preceded many hundreds of thousands of years with a more casual, and perhaps distant, pragmatic relationship with wolves as well. But about 45,000 years ago we start to see the bones change and indications that A, dogs are certainly living with us. And that living with us appears to have had certain effects on their biology and their physiology. That is what enabled them to become our best friends. Narrator: How does this relationship work? Olmert: There is a feedback system that both neurochemically and psychologically and behaviorally that sets up between you and your pet. And how good you are to your pet is often exactly reflected back. Although, what I would say is they tend to be wildly generous. More generous than we are. So, that is why, you know, they'll be wagging their tail, you know, thrilled to see you when you come home or if it's a cat it's purring. And you may be very distracted but they aren't. You are the greatest thing they ever saw if you've developed this relationship. If you've earned it. You have a different relationship with your own pet versus your, even your neighbor's pet, because it's, that's your closer family. It's a different kind of bond and when they do fMRI studies just like a mother will have certain brain regions light up very strongly in the dopamine and oxytocin rich areas when they look at a picture of their baby versus just another infant. When you look at a picture of your dog versus another dog, you see the same thing. If you love dogs you're gonna get this reward to a degree whether you are looking at your dog or not. Do therapy dogs work? Well they certainly can. Dogs can do amazing things. With our program Warrior Canine Connection we work with service members and veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. We have the patients who say, "This dog is better than any drug I ever took. I didn't sleep for five years until this dog slept next to me." Narrator: What happens to your body when you're with your dog? Olmert: Your heart rate comes down, your blood pressure comes down, your heart rate variability which is the ability of the heart to duck and dive and respond to stress improves. You release oxytocin, the opioids, adrenaline, and serotonin. So, all of these great reward chemicals and anti-stress chemicals can be released in both you and the pet. Narrator: What is oxytocin?  Olmert: Oxytocin is a very ancient chemical. It's in all social mammals. There's variations on it that you find in birds and in turtles, and in worms. And it most effectively is known for releasing breast milk and creating labor contractions. That's what it was first known for. So in a sense, it is the quintessential mammalian hormone since live birth and production of breast milk identifies us as mammals and mammary glands, et cetera. About 25 years ago they discovered that besides the oxytocin receptors and cells in the body that are producing oxytocin in the breast and the uterus, lo and behold, it's produced throughout the brain and in all the areas that control behavior and emotion. So what was it doing there? And what they discovered was that it was talking to other classic brain neurotransmitters such as serotonin, and dopamine and adrenaline, and the opioid system. And it was setting up, by doing that, this perfect mental physiologic state of calm. It is the most powerful drive and it creates the bond that lasts a lifetime. That's how strong it is.
Views: 93090 Science Insider
Large Hadron Collider — World's Largest Particle Accelerator Explained
 
02:54
The Large Hadron Collider is back in action at the CERN laboratory after receiving a big upgrade in the time since its last run in 2012. The particle collider is poised to make discoveries that could rewrite the book on particle physics. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsi... Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_ins... Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 49558 Science Insider
What Would Happen If You Died In Space?
 
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As humanity travels further into space, the question of how to deal with a dead body needs to be explored. NASA designed the "Body Back" method for this very reason. It involves freezing the body and turning it into a fine powder, that is then attached to the outside of the ship. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 52836 Science Insider
What’s Really Inside Kraft Singles And Other Processed Cheeses
 
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Next time you're going to town on a stringy diner grilled cheese sandwich, take a good deep look into the cheesy golden-yellow abyss. What is that stuff anyway? USDA research chemist Michael Tunick takes look at what goes into making processed cheese like Velveeta and Kraft Singles. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: A mixture of older cheeses. They grind them up and they add an emulsifier so that it holds together and it’s processed in a way so that it melts easily. So, my name is Michael Tunick. I'm a research chemist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and I wrote the book, "The Science of Cheese". Now, there are pasteurized processed cheeses out there and that's just a mixture of older cheeses and fresher cheeses. They grind them up and they add an emulsifier so that it holds together and it’s processed in a way so that it melts easily. Trade name for that would be Velveeta for instance. That name comes from the word "velvet", meaning the texture. It was invented right before World War I by J.L. Kraft, who was trying to get rid of some of his older cheeses so he mixed it with some of his newer cheeses and came up with Kraft American Cheese. Ever since then, cheese companies have been doing that kind of thing. It is legal, Food and Drug Administration has some rules regarding what it can be labeled as, such as "pasteurized processed cheese spread" and "pasteurized processed cheese food." They have to follow certain moisture and fat limitations and sometimes they have to be able to melt at a certain temperature or things like that. If it falls outside of those regulations, then the manufacturers call it some other things, but it is something that is found a lot in processed food. Philly cheesesteaks usually have cheese whiz melted on them. That is a pasteurized, process cheese. It’s something I would eat too, except it's not going to be nearly as good as a regular natural cheese.
Views: 125370 Science Insider
How Much Radiation Are You Exposed To Everyday?
 
01:20
People are often concerned about how radiation exposure may be affecting their health. It's true that extreme exposure can do terrible things to your body, but most of the radiation we absorb is in trace amounts from unexpected sources. Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ----------------------------------------­---------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 71874 Science Insider
How Fast Are We Moving Through The Universe?
 
02:04
You don't need a spaceship to shoot through space. We're actually doing it all the time. We live on a rotating planet, that orbits a star, that moves around a galaxy, that rockets through the universe constantly. But how fast are we moving, exactly? Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ----------------------------------------­---------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 50201 Science Insider
Nutella Is A Lot Worse For You Than You Think — What's Really Inside
 
01:32
Though made with some nuts, Nutella is actually unhealthy. Half of the beloved spread is straight sugar. One serving size has 21 grams of sugar, which is about how much you should have in one day. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 162119 Science Insider
What Caffeine Does To Your Brain
 
01:51
Coffee, Red Bull, whatever. We drink it for energy, but is that really what it gives us? Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 344273 Science Insider
Why The Octopus Is The Weirdest Animal On Earth
 
03:22
Octopuses are unlike any other organism on Earth. They can regrow limbs, change colors whenever they want, and use tools to their advantage. But perhaps the most unique thing an octopus can do is edit its RNA. By editing their RNA, octopuses make temporary changes to their genetic material and adapt to temperature changes in their environment. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 37580 Science Insider
Map Shows How Humans Migrated Across The Globe
 
02:24
It's tough to know what happened on Earth thousands of years before anyone started writing anything down. But thanks to the amazing work of anthropologists and paleontologists like those working on National Geographic's Genographic Project, we can begin to piece together the story of our ancestors. Here's how early humans spread from East Africa all around the world. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 995129 Science Insider
Why You Shouldn't Pee On A Jellyfish Sting
 
02:07
Most of the information on how to treat jellyfish stings, including some urban myths, might actually cause you more pain than relief. Rather than peeing on the wound, try pouring vinegar over it instead. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 60997 Science Insider
What Happens When You Get A Tattoo Removed
 
01:12
If you decide that you don't want that forever tattoo to last forever, you can have it removed with lasers. But how does laser tattoo removal work? Turns out it all has to do with the size of our white blood cells. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 72630 Science Insider
What Your Brain Is Like With A Concussion
 
01:27
Concussions can be extremely damaging, and they are more common than you might think. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsi... Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_ins... Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 62537 Science Insider
How SpaceX Plans To Land On Mars In 2018
 
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Elon Musk's private company SpaceX has big plans to usher in a new era of reusable rockets that could send the first humans to Mars and return them home. Here's how the company plans to land on the Red Planet as soon as 2018. Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ----------------------------------------­---------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 64533 Science Insider
What Really Happens During A Brain Freeze
 
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Drinking cold beverages is a great way to fight off the summer heat, but if you drink too quickly, it could lead to a brain freeze. But is your brain actually getting cold? Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: Ugh, brain freeze! It’s awful. That sharp searing pain in your forehead! But you know what’s even worse? Not everyone gets it! That’s right, some people can suck down as many milkshakes as they want and never feel a thing. Life is so unfair. And you know what else? These lucky people are ruining it for scientists, too. Brain freeze is one of those scientific mysteries that’s been around since the 1800s. Just throw it in there with UFOs and crop circles. We may never know the real reason behind them! Ok, maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration. But here’s the thing: The leading theories for what causes a brain freeze have to do with a physical response that everyone should feel. The way scientists think it works is this: Brain freeze happens when something cold hits the roof of your mouth, where it triggers your trigeminal nerve. It’s the nerve in charge of sensations you feel around the front of your head. That’s why, when you freeze it to subzero temperatures, the pain is around the temples and forehead. In fact, different nerves cause pain in different parts of your head. A toothache, for example, can irritate the mandibular nerve, causing pain near the central skull. But when it comes to a brain freeze the source of the pain is different from most other headaches. Turns out, it’s more similar to why your feet and hands sting when they get too cold. Your body floods that area with blood to try and return it to body temperature and in the process, your blood vessels expand, which causes that throbbing pain. Similarly, during a brain freeze, blood vessels in your brain widen, sending a rush of blood to the roof of your mouth and, in the process, cause pain. Now, the trigeminal nerve is a natural part of the body. So, if it’s the real cause of brain freeze, then that means everyone should get it. So why do scientists estimate that only 37% Americans actually feel it? And for that matter, 41% of children in Taiwan and only 15% of the adults in Denmark, according to another study? Researchers can only speculate: Maybe the trigeminal nerve is less sensitive in certain demographics. One thing that does seem to be clear is that people who do experience brain freeze may also be more susceptible to another kind of mysterious headache: migraines. In one small study, 93% of migraine patients were also prone to brain freeze. Which has led researchers to suspect that the trigeminal nerve also plays a key role in migraines. Whatever the reason, just hang in there. Brain freeze usually only last 20-30 seconds. Go ahead and take that time to remember not to slurp so quickly next time.
Views: 38856 Science Insider
What If The Moon Were Actually Made Of Cheese?
 
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It's a classic fable that dates back decades, but as we all (hopefully) know, the moon is not actually made of cheese. But what if it were? Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ----------------------------------------­---------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 39942 Science Insider
Putting The History Of Earth Into Perspective
 
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The Earth is really, really old. Over 4 1/2 billion years old, in fact. How do we begin to comprehend a number that large? It helps to put it on a more fathomable scale. Watch to see where Earth's major events would fall on a timeline stretching across the US. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 429742 Science Insider
What Happens When Lightning Strikes A Plane
 
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If you're on a plane that's struck by lightning, you're going to notice a bright flash and a loud boom. But there's no need to panic. Because airplanes are struck by lightning frequently, they are designed to withstand the extreme heat. Every plane in the US commercial fleet is struck by lightning about once a year. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 31612 Science Insider
How The Ancient Greeks Proved Earth Wasn't Flat 2,200 Years Ago
 
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In the mid-20th century, scientists began launching satellites into space that would help determine the exact circumference of the Earth. But over 2,000 years earlier, a man in Ancient Greece came up with nearly the exact same figure using just a stick and his brain. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 56571 Science Insider
How Long Drugs Actually Stay In Your System
 
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Drugs like marijuana, cocaine, and MDMA can remain in your system for days, weeks, and even months. But they vary drastically in how long they can be detected in your urine, blood, and hair. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 525515 Science Insider
This Map Shows Where American Accents Come From
 
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When you're traveling to another part of the US than you're originally from, it might be surprising to hear how different the locals sound. For instance, a New Yorker will likely speak the same English language in a completely different accent from a native Texan. How did Americans get so many distinctive accents? Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: NEW ENGLAND Let's start with New England, which was one of the first US regions to develop its own American English accent. Today, a speaker from New England might say "Were you gonna plagiarize the whole thing for us? You have any thoughts of your own on this matter? Is that your thing; you come into a bar and read some obscure passage and pretend...you pawn it off as your own?" NEW YORK For such a geographically small area, New York City certainly has a bunch of distinctive accents. But in general, its accents evolved from a mixture of its Dutch and English roots and numerous waves of immigration. A modern speaker from New York probably won’t sound like what you hear in movies like "Hey, I'm walking here! I'm walking here!" They’re more likely to say "Deep dish pizza is not not only better than New York pizza, it's not pizza." DELAWARE RIVER VALLEY New York’s New Jersian and Pennsylvanian neighbors sounded quite different. Nowadays, someone from Philly might say "We're a regular family. We watch Philly jawn on TV. We go down to the Jersey Shore. But when we want great hoagies, discount prices on beer, and a great atmosphere we go to Lee's Hoagies in Horsham, PA." SOUTHERN COAST Let’s take a look at what went on down south. The southern coast of the United States has a variety of different accents. One example is Southern coastal white. "What concerns me about the American press is this endless...endless attempt to label the guy some kind of kook." AFRICAN AMERICAN Other southern dialects preserved some of the original remnants to this day. "They come over here and get oysters and clam and go fishing because they're right down the road. They're right in Brunswick or Savannah or Jacksonville. Much later, a wave of African Americans migrated from the American South to urban centers in the North, mixing their accents together. "Being a kid from New York City, I mean from Brooklyn. And my aunt — God bless her soul — she used to always take me to The Rockettes — you know, the Easter show and the Christmas show." APPALACHIANS he Ulster-Scots had a significant influence on many American dialects in the South and West. Most of the original accent has disappeared, and today, an American from Tennessee might sound like this. "Now, I am just who I am. I'm not always nice. I choose to be good. I choose to have a good attitude because I want people to know. I am a girl with many colors." MIDWEST As the Appalachian settlers headed west, their accents joined with speech patterns from the North. The Midwest has many diverse accents. Today, a speaker from the Great Lakes might say "I was born in the middle of the century in the middle of the country; a classic baby boomer." Or more famously, "We got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark, and we're wearing sunglasses." While another from Wisconsin/Minnesota/the Dakotas might say "If either of these men draw, I'm gonna be forced to shoot some people, and I don't want to do that." TEXAS Down in Texas, a very distinct accent developed. The famous Texan accent we know from movies like "They shot and killed a state senator named Bibs in Waco, Texas." has started to level out. Visitors to big cities like Houston might be surprised to hear something more like "Thank you to everyone who worked so hard to beautifully capture the profundity of deep southern culture." CALIFORNIA Last but not least is the West Coast, which had a very different mix of immigrants compared to the East Coast. California doesn’t come close to having one, distinct accent. A modern-day speaker might sound like "We woke up the next morning on his actual birthday. And I told him I wanted to take him somewhere to lunch for his birthday." or "What's so powerful about this novel is everyone has their own interpretation to these characters." These are just a handful of American accents...and they’re still evolving as we speak. We’ll have to check back in a century or so from now to see what happens next.
Views: 240258 Science Insider
What Happens To Your Body After You Die
 
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Just minutes after you die, enzymes in your body that helped to keep you alive switch gears and start the decomposition process. The hotter it is, the faster your enzymes can digest you from the inside out. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 35318 Science Insider
What You Should Know About the 'Danger Triangle' On Your Face
 
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Those nose hairs that people like to pluck and trim are actually helping to filter the air particles that we breathe in. When you damage those nose hairs, there's a chance of causing an extremely dangerous or even lethal infection. See more from Dr. Erich Voigt: https://nyulangone.org/doctors/1851315147/erich-p-voigt Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider
Views: 205489 Science Insider
Astronaut Shares Story About His First Time In Space
 
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On November 12, 1995, Chris Hadfield went on his very first trip to space. Since that day, Hadfield has spent a total of 166 days in space, gone on two spacewalks, and become a two-time best-selling author. The legendary astronaut takes us back to that November day and tells us what it was like to blast off into space for the very first time. Subscribe to BI: Science - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uD-W5zQHQuAVT2GdcLCvg ----------------------------------------­---------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI Video On Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1bkB8qg Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ----------------------------------------­---------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 18201 Science Insider
The Deadliest Venomous Animals In The World
 
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Some of the world’s deadliest animals have venom that's thousands of times more toxic than cyanide and can kill a human in minutes. Brown snakes, funnel web spiders, and blue-ringed octopuses are among the animals that you do not want to mess with. We spoke with Steve Trim at Venomtech (www.venomtech.co.uk) who helped us rank some of the deadliest bites to humans on Earth. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Following is a transcript of the video: You’ve been bitten! And uh oh, it’s venomous! How long have you got? Well, that depends on a few factors including the potency, dose delivered and speed of distribution. Turns out, not all Venoms act the same way. Here are the animals with the fastest-acting venom on Earth. First up: spiders. There are around 40,000 species of spider and most are venomous. But, thankfully, only a handful pose a threat to humans. Including the male Sydney funnel-web spider. Its venom is 60 times as potent as cyanide and can kill a human in 1-2 hours. The venom attacks the nervous system kicking it into overdrive until — ultimately — it shuts down! Of course, spiders aren’t the only venomous animals in Australia. It’s home to 20 of the world’s 25 deadliest snakes. Including the Eastern brown snake, which is responsible for the most snakebite deaths in the country. Its venom is 8,000 times stronger than cyanide and can kill a human in about one hour. Its venom also attacks the central nervous system but this time it slows everything down. And to top it off, the venom has a coagulant that causes the blood in your veins and arteries to clot. Between the two, it’s not a good way to go. Now, at this point, you might consider switching your Australian safari to a scuba dive just to be on the safe side. But, turns out venomous animals live in Australian waters too. Like the blue-ringed octopus. Its venom is 1,000 times more toxic than cyanide and it’ll bring down a human in just 20-40 minutes. Bacteria in its saliva make an extremely potent neurotoxin which paralyzes your muscles. And once that paralysis hits your diaphragm and rib muscles, you only have a few minutes before you suffocate to death. No, the fastest-acting venom on Earth belongs to the Australian Box Jellyfish or sea wasp. It’s not the most potent venom out there. But encounter one of these guys and you’ll be dead in 15 minutes. That’s all because of these things They’re COVERED with tiny, venom-loaded darts, called nematocysts. Which shoot heart-stopping toxins into the body wherever they make contact. All of this sounds pretty scary, but remember you’re less likely to die by venomous snails than by car crashes, an infection, or disease. And it’s not like these animals are after you anyways. They’d just as well prefer that you stick to your own habitat. But still be smart, be respectful, be safe.
Views: 38780 Science Insider